Victorygirlbutterfly

Journey Prize

It is a lovely irony of literature that the largest Canadian prize for short fiction was endowed by an American.  James A. Mitchener’s Canadian royalties from his 1988 novel Journey fund the $10,000 Journey prize, or at least they used to, since the prize is now officially called “The Writers’ Trust of Canada/McClelland & Stewart Journey Prize.”  (It is also a literary irony that a man known for his lengthy novels — remember The Source? — endowed a short fiction prize; but Mitchener won a Pulitzer for his excellent collection Tales of the South Pacific.)

The truly fantastic aspect of the Journey prize is that it does not go into the coffers of writers who’ve made it in the publishing world, but to writers just getting started and who need both the money and the encouragement that this prize affords.  Nominees are “new and developing Canadian writers during the early stages of their career…  Writers who have published more than three books of fiction, or who have won national awards for their fiction, or whose fiction has already received substantial attention are not eligible for consideration.”

Part of Pulp Literature’s mandate is to publish works from emerging writers, so we had lots of material to choose from.  It was hard to choose only three stories, but after borrowing editions of past winners from the library, we three editors made our choices as to which stories stood the best chances of winning.  We are proud to announce and congratulate Pulp Literature’s three nominees for the Journey Prize:Mich_journey_1st_ed

SL Nickerson, ‘Only the Loons Know’
Pulp Literature Issue 1, Winter 2014

Trevor Shikaze, ‘The Tun’
Pulp Literature Issue 2, Spring 2014

Ace Baker, ‘Victory Girl’
Pulp Literature Issue 4, Autumn 2014

Best of luck to these deserving authors.  We’re rooting for you!

One thought on “Journey Prize

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Time limit is exhausted. Please reload the CAPTCHA.