2019 Year of Authors: 18 – 22 Feb

In honour of Pulp Literature Press’s fifth anniversary and of all the people who have contributed to our success we have declared 2019 our Year of Authors, celebrating the amazing artists and authors from the first twenty issues of Pulp Literature.

Every weekday we are featuring one of these creators on our Facebook page, and the issues that person contributed to will be on sale for a whopping 50% off.  Make a note of the authors and artists you’re following and jump on these deals.  Some print issues are rare and getting scarcer, so nab them while you still can!

Here’s our line-up for the seventh week…

18th February – 22nd February 2019

Monday: Christine Leviczky Riek, Issue 20

Christine Leviczky Riek is a poet and photographer from Surrey, BC. Her evocative poem, ‘All I Need Is A Chair, My Red Piano, And’, was a runner-up in the 2018 Magpie Award for Poetry. She is also the winner of the Capilano Review‘s 2017 Robin Blaser Poetry Prize. Her 2017 chapbook, Inventory For A Voyage [da Capo sin’ al Fine], is available through Light Factory Publications.

Tuesday: Claire Gregory, Issue 14

Claire’s been everywhere, and her worldliness has informed her interests and her writing. She has been spinning stories all her life, both in the pages of her fiction and in her career as an archaeologist and historian. She combines her Irish storytelling heritage, a deep love of her local Australian landscape, and a particular interest in the darkest edges of human conflict, to explore the ways people lived and loved in the past. Her story, ‘Forget Me Not’ was the winner of the 2016 Surrey International Writer’s Conference Storyteller’s Award and was published in Issue 14.

Wednesday: Colin Thornton, Issue 14

Life has a roundabout way of leading one to writing. Colin Thornton studied drawing and painting in college, and played music for a few decades while he built a career in advertising. Now he’s settled into writing short stories, one of which you can read in Issue 14, titled ‘Candy-Apple Baby’.

Thursday: Conor Powers-Smith, Issue 3

Conor Powers-Smith grew up in New Jersey and Ireland. He currently works as a reporter on Cape Cod, in Massachusetts. Despite being a vocal Yankees fan, he has not, as of this writing, been murdered. His stories have appeared in AE, Daily Science Fiction, The Fog Horn, Nature, and other magazines. His short story, ‘Love For Sale’, appeared in Issue 3.

Friday: Cristina Crocker Escribano, Issue 9

Cristina Crocker Escribano’s work has appeared in The Meadow, Lake Effect, and elsewhere. She recently returned from Costa Rica, where she was a history and English teacher. A recent graduate  of the University of Michigan’s Helen Zell Writers’ Program, her flash fiction piece, ‘The Last Neanderthals’, won the 2015 Hummingbird Prize for Flash Fiction and appears in Issue 9.

Climbing Mountains, Placing Description. Writing Tips from Pulp Literature Press.

It kills me when I hear readers complain that there’s too much description in a book. In my experience as an acquisitions editor, most “unneccesary” description is only misplaced.

“When you’re writing a book, it’s rather like going on a very long walk, across mountains and valleys and things, and you get the first view of something and you write it down.” -Roald Dahl

3 places readers need us to give them description.

  1. While the POV character is pursuing the story goal, it’s vital to show what’s going on. Not during the planning, not during the reaction to raised stakes, but during the active quest for the goal.
  2. When the reader is gagging to know what is in the letter, under the carpet, or outside the door. Make the reader wait with a bit of description.
  3. After the POV character has reacted to the raised stakes, there is a moment to remember what’s at stake. Descriptive writing is absolutely necessary here to remind the character, and readers, exactly why the struggle is necessary.

“Then you walk a bit further, maybe up onto the top of a hill, and you see something else. Then you write that and you go on like that, day after day, getting different views of the same landscape really. The highest mountain on the walk is obviously the end of the book, because it’s got to be the best view of all, when everything comes together and you can look back and see that everything you’ve done all ties up.” -Roald Dahl

A great example of description perfectly placed and timed to move the story onwards.

Take a look at the scene in Dahl’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory when Charlie has found a dollar and will buy a chocolate bar. Magic.

I hope you’ll have another brilliant week in your writing career.

Cheers, Mel

Mel Anastasiou writes The Fairmount Manor Mysteries series, starring Mrs Stella Ryman, The Hertfordshire Pub Mysteries series, starring Spencer Stevens, and is Senior Acquisitions Editor with Pulp Literature Press.

If you enjoy reading Mel Anastasiou’s writing tips, get her pocket-sized writing guide, The Writer’s Boon Companion: Thirty Days Towards an Extraordinary Volume, here

Motivates, organizes, encourages, inspires.

2019 Year of Authors: 11 – 15 Feb

In honour of Pulp Literature Press’s fifth anniversary and of all the people who have contributed to our success we have declared 2019 our Year of Authors, celebrating the amazing artists and authors from the first twenty issues of Pulp Literature.

Every weekday we are featuring one of these creators on our Facebook page, and the issues that person contributed to will be on sale for a whopping 50% off.  Make a note of the authors and artists you’re following and jump on these deals.  Some print issues are rare and getting scarcer, so nab them while you still can!

Here’s our line-up for the sixth week …

11th February – 15th February 2019

Monday: Britt-Lise Newstead, Issue 10 & 17

Britt-Lise Newstead is a storyboard artist, concept artist, and illustrator based in Halifax. She has been part of the video game industry since 2009, and the animation industry since 2015, though her interests are numerous and never satiated. Two of her pieces, ‘She Doesn’t Know She’s Small’ and ‘The Patron Saint of the Inevitable Death of the Universe’, grace Issues 10 and 17, respectively.
Issue 10 small

Tuesday: Carol Berg, Issue 10

Former software engineer Carol Berg didn’t believe she could write one novel, never mind fifteen epic fantasies, never mind win the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adult Literature. She was Issue 10‘s featured author, and the first book in her next series is due out this year. Be sure to catch her at Norwestcon 42 this April!

Issue 10 small

Wednesday: Carolyn Oliver, Issue 13

A graduate of The Ohio State University and Boston University, Carolyn Oliver lives in Massachusetts with her family. Her work has appeared in or is forthcoming from Slush Pile Magazine, Midway Journal, matchbook, and Constellations, among others. Carolyn’s work has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize and Best of the Net. Discover why all fairytales follow a common theme in her short story, ‘The Green Thread and the Blue’, in Issue 13.

Thursday: CC Humphreys, Issue 1 & 14

Footloose?He’s an actor, playwright, and fight choreographer. Oh, he’s also an award-winning novelist.  CC Humphreys is the distinguished 1st Issue feature author, appearing again in Issue 14. He’s a chimaera, like so many of our authors — and professional in every field (if his 16 published books and plethora of acting credits are anything to go by).

     

Friday: Charity Tahmaseb, Issue 15 & 19

Charity Tahmaseb has slung corn on the cob for Green Giant and jumped out of airplanes (but not at the same time). She’s worn both Girl Scout and Army green. These days, she writes fiction and works as a technical writer in St. Paul, Minnesota. Her short fiction credits include stories in Deep MagicEscape Pod, Cicada, and Pulp Literature. She’s been nominated twice for a Pushcart Prize Award, and her first novel (The Geek Girl’s Guide to Cheerleading) was a YALSA 2012 Popular Paperback pick in the Get Your Geek On category. Her work consistently impresses in our writing contests, and can be read in Issue 15 & Issue 19.

Awards Nomination Season: the 2018 Round Up

We love awards! As a multi-genre publisher, we try to nominate our authors for as many awards as we can to help their careers along. For fan-based awards we rely on you, our fans who are members of organizations like the CFFSA and SFWA, to nominate your favourites.  To help you sort out eligibility, here’s a list of everything we’ve published this year, with the exception of reprints and novel exerpts, sorted by genre.  Stories that overlap genres may be listed more than once.

If you are interested in receiving complimentary review copies of any of these works, please fill out the form at the bottom of the page, and don’t forget to put us down for consideration in your respective circles!

2018 Publications

Asterisks * indicate Canadian authors.  Contest winners are identifed following the title.  For lists of specific author identities, such as women writers, writers of colour, or self-identified LGBTQIA writers please email us at info (at) pulpliterature.com.

Fantasy, Science Fiction, and Horror

Novellas & Novelettes
Pulp Literature Issue 17, Winter 2018
‘The Bridgewater Canal Mystery’ by Mel Anastasiou *
‘We Come Back Different Pt. 1’ by AJ Odasso
Pulp Literature Issue 18, Spring 2018
‘We Come Back Different Pt. 2’ by AJ Odasso
Pulp Literature Issue 19, Summer 2018
‘The Machineries of Progress’ by Mel Anastasiou *
Pulp Literature Issue 20, Autumn 2018
Flavour of the Forsaken’ by Kristene Perron*

Short Stories 
Pulp Literature Issue 17, Winter 2018
‘Desdemone’ by JJ Lee*
‘Embers’ by Misha Handman*
‘For the Love of Grey’ by Anat Rabkin*
Pulp Literature Issue 18, Spring 2018
‘The Commute’ by Sophie Panzer*
‘Meggie’ (Raven Contest Runner-up) – by Kerry Craven*
Pulp Literature Issue 19, Summer 2018
‘My Brother Paulie: A Domestic Space Odyssey’ by Alex Reece Abbott
‘The Slade Transmutation’ by Richard J O’Brien
‘Ordinary’ by Sylvia Stopforth*
‘Guardian’ by Susan Pieters*
‘Five Minutes’ by Jasmin Nyack*
Pulp Literature Issue 20, Autumn 2018
‘Away Game’ by Mitchell Toews*
‘Small Town Superhero’ by Dave Beynon*
‘Every Town Has One’ by Epiphany Ferrell
‘Waking Up Black’ by Susan Pieters *
‘Indebted’ by Summer Jewel Keown
‘The Hub’ (SiWC Contest Runner-up) –  by Erin Evans*

Graphic Arts Short Stories
Pulp Literature Issue 17, Winter 2018
‘Afloat’ by Gabriel Craven and Mikayla Fawcett*
Pulp Literature Issue 18, Spring 2018
‘Bone Dry’ by Roy Gray and Ben Baldwin
Pulp Literature Issue 19, Summer 2018
‘Blue Skies Over Nine Isles’ by Joseph Stilwell & Hugh Henderson*
Pulp Literature Issue 20, Autumn 2018
‘Meat’ by Mel Anastasiou*

Mystery

Novellas & Novelettes
Pulp Literature Issue 17, Winter 2018
‘The Bridgewater Canal Mystery’ by Mel Anastasiou *
Pulp Literature Issue 18, Spring 2018
‘Stella Ryman and the Mystery of the Mah-Jongg Box’ by Mel Anastasiou *
Pulp Literature Issue 19, Summer 2018
‘The Machineries of Progress’ by Mel Anastasiou *

Contemporary, Literary, and Historical

Short Stories
Pulp Literature Issue 17, Winter 2018
‘One Safe Place’, by Erin Slaughter
‘Lineman’ by Susan Pieters*
‘Theft of Confidence’ by Soramimi Hanarejima
‘Just Down the Hall’ (Hummingbird Prize) – by Jeanette Topar
‘The Bruised Peach’ (Hummingbird Prize Runner-up) – by William Kaufmann
Pulp Literature Issue 18, Spring 2018
‘Bug in my Ear’ by Susan Pieters*
‘The Tape’ (Raven Contest Winner) – Elaine McDivitt*
‘MVP’ (SiWC Contest Winner) – by Michelle Barker*
Pulp Literature Issue 19, Summer 2018
‘The Potato Bug War’ by Charity Tahmaseb*
‘Towing the Mustang’ (SiWC Contest Runner-up) –  by Keltie Zubko*
‘Lullaby, Valentine, Paper Crane’ (Bumblebee Contest Winner) by RS Wynn
Pulp Literature Issue 20, Autumn 2018
‘Gross Motor’ by Sara Mang*
‘Alphabet Soup’ by Alex Reece Abbott

Poetry

Pulp Literature Issue 17, Winter 2018
‘Devonian’ by Emily Osborne *
‘Tattoo’ by John Davies
‘You don’t know your life anyway’ by Kelli Allen
‘Sea Changes’ by Matilda Berke
Pulp Literature Issue 18, Spring 2018
‘Colour Blind Son’ by Susan Alexander*
‘On a Dark Lake’s Edge’ by Angela Rebrec*
Pulp Literature Issue 19, Summer 2018
‘First Date’ by Maria Pascualy
‘He Had This Thing’ by James Norcliffe
Pulp Literature Issue 20, Autumn 2018
‘Leather wraps both our shoulders, and I will call you my lungs, my falconer, guidepost’ (Magpie Award Winner) – by Kelli Allen
‘All I Need Is A Chair, My Red Piano, And’ (Magpie Award Runner-up) – by Christine Leviczky Riek*
‘My desk’ (Magpie Award Runner-up) – by Angela Caravan*

Artwork

Cover Art
Pulp Literature Issue 17, Winter 2018
Patron Saint of the Inevitable Death of the Universe,
by Britt-Lise Newstead*
Pulp Literature Issue 18, Spring 2018
Windseeker,
by Akem*
Pulp Literature Issue 19, Summer 2018
After the Tsunami,
by Tais Teng
Pulp Literature Issue 20, Autumn 2018
Jinn  by Ben Baldwin

Illustrations
Pulp Literature Issue 20, Autumn 2018
Illustration for ‘Away Game’ by John Henry Friesen*

Body of work, Mel Anastasiou: Pulp Literature Issues 17 – 20

Body of work, JM Landels: Illustrations for Allaigna’s Song: Aria in Pulp Literature Issue 17, Winter 2018

ADVENT has launched!

It’s a new year and we’re amping up our productivity with five new novels set for release in 2019! First among these is Advent by Michael Kamakana. We’ve been teasing our readers with this release for quite some time, but the day has finally come… Advent is now available for purchase on our website and Amazon!

In honour of this momentous occasion, and to get a feel for the author and the novel, here’s an interview with Michael Kamakana, originally published along side an excerpt of the novel in Issue 19.

Feature Interview

Michael Kamakana

Pulp Literature: What drew you to writing science fiction in the first place?
Michael Kamakana: I read SF as a youth—award winners, names like Clarke, Le Guin, Dick, Lem. I admired scientists like my father. I knew I myself would not be a scientist as my
interest in math and physics was… time to sleep. I was interested in fantastic escape that I could imagine possible.

PL: What titles and authors inspired you in the early days?
MK: Fountains of Paradise by Clarke, then Left Hand of Darkness by Le Guin, then The Man in the High Castle by Dick, then Neuromancer by Gibson, then The Snow Queen by de Vinge. First non-SFwould be The Great Gatsby by Fitzgerald, A Farewell to Arms by Hemingway, then Spring Snow by Mishima, then In the Labyrinth by Robbe-Grillet, then The Name of the Rose by Eco, then If on a Winter’s Night a Traveller by Calvino, then The Woman in the Dunes
by Kobo Abe, then…

PL: What kind of philosophy books do you read?
MK: I read almost entirely ‘continental’ philosophers of the 20th Century. My favourites at the moment are Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Edmund Husserl, Henri Bergson, Gilles Deleuze.

PL: You and your protagonist both survive a coma. How does your experience with trauma influence your storytelling?
MK: I always feel that when I truly understand any teaching or experience is when I can write a definitive story inspired by it. For now I keep writing, I keep hoping that someday I will understand the coma.

PL: You call the stories ‘essays.’ Why is that? Do you feel that each section is a separate topic?
MK: Well, the ‘reset’ and ‘reserve’ sections came first, and I was inspired by Munif’s ‘Endings’ to use the collective pronouns of ‘we’ and ‘they.’ Gradually both collapsing into ‘some people’, they have generalized, removed, clinical renderings of the times, not much identifiable personal psychology. I think ‘essays’ could be thought ‘fictions’ like Jorge Luis Borges.

PL: You’re a prolific writer. Do you work on more than one novel at a time?
MK: Actually I have about seven works at various stages and interest, with more ideas percolating.

PL: Did you spend time in Hawai’i as a child? How has this affected the
point of view of the narrator of your novel?
MK: I went to the islands about every winter as a child. We lived on the windward side of Oahu for a year in high school, and Father was working at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa. I still go every February to my mom’s hometown, Waimea, on the island of Kaua’i. I can pronounce words in Hawai’ian but cannot converse. I guess I am multicultural as my background is usually one of the first things to learn about me. But I am fortunate that in Canada I look mostly like a dark white guy, whereas in Hawai’i most people recognize me as part Hawai’ian. So, I have never faced much racism here in Canada. I always identified with the ‘Indians’ in Westerns, with indigenous peoples anywhere. And this work was inspired by reading Red Gold by Hemming, which recounts what happened when the Spanish and Portuguese contacted Brazilian indigenes. I just decided to reverse polarities and think of us humans as the technologically primitive and the aliens as the invaders.

Only the start is set in Hawai’i. Most of the essays are not localized as generic North American. The biographical passages are many places. As a beginning, I remember the fear of nuclear war coming to end everything on a beautiful day in Waimea, so this Advent is a different end of the world.

PL: Did you always want to be a writer?
MK:I knew I was going to be an artist of some sort, only gradually did I realize it was going to be writing. Father’s elder sister is an author, Father’s younger sister was a visual artist, so this has always been possible, valued, and I suppose reading the first story in my aunt’s first collection clarified my desires to do narrative prose. On the other, I have for many years avoided using my family as material because that had upset Father early on in his sister’s work.

PL: Do you have any hopes that Advent will change the way people think about
their lives, about aliens, about our many assumptions?
MK: I hope readers are entertained, are even just momentarily inspired to see themselves and all other humans from an ironic perspective, an existential and historical attitude.

PL: Did the process of writing Advent change the way you felt about yourself
as a coma survivor?
MK: Actually the change developed during the writing: I knew the biographical sections would come down to ‘he’ then ‘I’, but only discovered what the aliens want at about the same time I wrote it. I have always had high expectations of myself and limited beliefs in myself, so I am first happy it will be published, then reconciled somewhat to the losses of the coma. Basically, like the aliens decide: I do not know what I would be if not an author.

Get Advent on sale till February 15th and be among the first to read this stunning debut novel.

 

2019 Year of Authors: 4 – 8 Feb

In honour of Pulp Literature Press’s fifth anniversary and of all the people who have contributed to our success we have declared 2019 our Year of Authors, celebrating the amazing artists and authors from the first twenty issues of Pulp Literature.

Every weekday we are featuring one of these creators on our Facebook page, and the issues that person contributed to will be on sale for a whopping 50% off.  Make a note of the authors and artists you’re following and jump on these deals.  Some print issues are rare and getting scarcer, so nab them while you still can!

Here’s our line-up for the fifth week …

4th February – 8th February 2019

Monday: Beverley Boissery, Issue 1

Transplanted from Australia to Vancouver, BC, Beverley Boissery was slated as an up and comer by the Surrey International Writer’s Conference back in 2006 (and they do know how to pick ’em!). She usually writes young adult novels, but in Issue 1, she gives us a taste of her poetic prowess with ‘Encompassed’.

Tuesday: Bevan Thomas, Issue 12

Bevan is a prominent member of Cloudscape Comics and has contributed to many of their graphic novel anthologies as a writer and editor. He doesn’t restrict himself to any one medium or genre, and practices the art of world building through a variety of formats. He collaborated with Eric Johnson for Issue 12’s graphic short, ‘Curse of the Woods’.

     

Wednesday: Bob Thurber, Issue 3, 6, & 12

The name Bob Thurber should be familiar to you, whether it’s because you’ve been following his award-winning writing career for some time now, or you see his name pop up as the judge in our annual flash fiction contests. Renowned for his very brief stories, Bob has been called a master of Micro Fiction and a pioneer of Flash Fiction. His story, ‘The Summer of Sweet Mary (circa 1972)’, won the 2018 Story of the Year Award from 50-Word Stories. Bob’s work appears in Issues 3 & 6, and he dishes up a tension loaded tale as Issue 12’s feature author.

Thursday: Brandon Crilly, Issue 16

Educator and self-described ‘writer for life’, Brandon Crilly has been previously published by On Spec, The 2017 Young Explorer’s Adventure Guide, Third Flatiron Anthologies and other markets. He received an Honourable Mention in the 2016 Writer’s Digest Popular Fiction Awards, contributes regularly to BlackGate.com, and develops programming for Can-Con in Ottawa.

       

Friday: Brenda Carre, Issue 15

Another educator, and artist to boot! Brenda Carre writes long and short fiction with a dark, mythic twist—stories often set in locations near her home on Vancouver Island or in the Chronicles of Ardebrin, the epic fantasy series she is currently crafting. Brenda’s short fiction has appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, as well as anthologies from Fiction River and Ragnarok Press. Her piece in Issue 15 introduced the titular heroine of her upcoming novel set in Ardebrin: Gret.

     

2019 Year of Authors: 28 Jan – 1 Feb

In honour of Pulp Literature Press’s fifth anniversary and of all the people who have contributed to our success we have declared 2019 our Year of Authors, celebrating the amazing artists and authors from the first twenty issues of Pulp Literature.

Every weekday we are featuring one of these creators on our Facebook page, and the issues that person contributed to will be on sale for a whopping 50% off.  Make a note of the authors and artists you’re following and jump on these deals.  Some print issues are rare and getting scarcer, so nab them while you still can!

Here’s our line-up for the fourth week …

28th January – 1st February 2019

Monday: Arantzazu Martinez, Issue 4

An academic painter from Vitoria, Spain, Arantzazu Martinez attended the Fine Arts University of the Basque Country. She has been recognized as an ARC Living Master by the Art Renewal Center, and was awarded the William Bouguereau Award in 2013. Most of her artwork belongs to private collections but now we can see some of her paintings in the European Museum of Modern Art in Barcelona, Spain. Pulp Literature approached her on spec to see if any of her paintings were available as book covers, and we were thrilled to be able to purchase use of “The Fall of the Ego” for Issue 4.

Tuesday: Ashley-Elizabeth Best, Issue 9

Ashley-Elizabeth Best lives and writes inKingston, Ontario. Her work can be seen in Fjords, Tampa ReviewCV2, The Columbia Review, Berfrois, The Rusty Toque, The Battersea Review, The PuritanZouch Magazine, Union Station Magazine, Grist, Ambit Magazine, Poetry Salzburg Review and Branch Magazine, among other publications. Her debut collection of poems, Slow States of Collapse, was shortlisted for the Robert Kroetsch Award for Innovative Poetry. Her poem ‘Wintering’ appeared in Pulp Literature Issue 9.

Wednesday: AY Dorsey, Issue 2

In her own words, AY Dorsey has written too many YA novels for her own good, but we believe that a productive writer is the best kind! With a total of 35 books and numerous short stories and screenplays available for public consumption, AY Dorsey is certainly productive. Her paranormal short story, ‘Falling’, appeared in Pulp Literature Issue 2,Spring 2014.

Thursday: Ben Baldwin, Issues 18 & 20

Ben Baldwin is a self-taught freelance artist from the UK who works with a combination of traditional media, photography, and digital art programs.  He has been shortlisted for the British Fantasy Award for Best Artist for the last seven years and has also been shortlisted for the British Science Fiction Association Award for Best Artist.  In 2013, he won Best Artist of the Year in the annual This Is Horror Awards. His short horror comic ‘Bone Dry’ with writer Roy Gray appeared in Pulp Literature Issue 18, and he is the cover artist for PL Issue 20.

Friday: Benjamin Hertwig, Issue 15

Benjamin Hertwig’s writing has appeared in the New York Times, the Literary Review of Canada, Prairie Fire, Pleiades, THIS, Freefall, Matrix, QWERTY, Sugar House Review, Maine Review, and Word Riot. His debut book of poems, Slow War, was a shortlisted finalist for the Governor General’s Award for English-language poetry.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2019 Year of Authors: 21 – 25 Jan

As we continue our Year of Authors, celebrating the amazing artists and authors from the first twenty issues of Pulp Literature, we enter a week of four Angelas and an Anna!

21st – 25th January 2019

Monday: Angela Caravan, Issue 20

Angela Caravan writes poetry and fiction. She lives in Vancouver, BC, with a boy and a man and sometimes has trouble telling the difference between the two.  You can find some of her recent writing in Longleaf Review and Reel Honey Mag.

Tuesday: Angela Melick, Issue 1

Angela, aka ‘Jam’ is an engineer who draws comics at night.  She lives in Vancouver BC with Trevor, who is a fish. She has no cats … yet.  She likes skiing and cycling, coffee and pancakes, manga and physics.  She hates squirrels and puddles, mean people and loud noises.  She chronicles her life in webcomic version at wastedtalent.ca.  “The Mechanics” orginally appeared in Exploded View (Cloudscape Comics, 2010).

Wednesday: Angela Post, Issue 15

‘Sourdough’ was the runner-up in the 2016 Surrey International Writers’ Conference Storyteller’s Award, judged by Jack Whyte and Diana Gabaldon.  Angela Post was born in the Yukon and grew up with her Brazilian mother and Latvian father in a mining town inhabited by about 500 people. She writes young adult and children’s books when not working as a psychologist.  During her lunch-time walks around SFU, the character of the mountain-dwelling prospector, or ‘sourdough’, began dogging her steps until she wrote about him. You can follow Angela on twitter @angspost.

Thursday: Angela Rebrec, Issue 18

Angela Rebrec is a writer, singer, graphic artist, and mother who works as a longshoreman to help fund her many passions.  Her writing has appeared most recently in Prairie Fire, Grain, The Antigonish Review, and PRISM International’s Creative Nonfiction Contest.  She is the managing editor of pulp mag, Kwantlen Polytechnic University’s magazine of literature and fine art, and facilitates writing workshops with elementary-aged children as well.  Angela lives with her husband and three children in Delta on unceded Coast Salish lands. Her poem ‘On a Dark Lake’s Edge’ was shortlisted for the 2017 Magpie Award for Poetry.

Friday: Anna Belkine, Issues 6 & 13

Anna Belkine is a data analyst, living in California. She writes during those powerful moments of creative inspiration that occur when both of her kids are asleep at the same time. Her  flash fiction story, ‘The Ravens’ came out in Pulp Literature Issue 6, Spring 2015, and ‘You Better Watch Out’ was a Christmas Horror piece appearing in Issue 13, Winter 2017.

What the Wind Brings: Matthew Hughes’s Magnum Opus

We are delighted to announce that we’ve entered into a contract with Matthew Hughes to publish his spectacular historical novel, What the Wind Brings. 

What the Wind Brings by Matthew Hughes

In the mid 1500s shipwrecked African slaves melded with the indigenous peoples of coastal Ecuador and together they fought the Spanish colonial power to a standstill, to remain independent for centuries.  The story of the people of Esmeraldas is told through the eyes of three characters: Alonso, an escaped slave; Expectation, an a-gender shaman; and Alejandro, a priest on the run from the Inquistion.

With its slipstream elements this novel carries a flavour of South American magical realism tradition into a grand historical epic.  Both sweeping and intimate, it is a delight to read from beginning to end, and we are honoured that Matt has decided to entrust his grand work to us.

We can’t wait to show it to you later this year.  In the meantime you can follow Matthew Hughes on his Patreon feed for more news as we approach publication.

Here’s to what the wind is bringing in 2019!

2019 Year of Authors: 14 – 18 Jan

In honour of Pulp Literature Press’s fifth anniversary and of all the people who have contributed to our success we have declared 2019 our Year of Authors, celebrating the amazing artists and authors from the first twenty issues of Pulp Literature.

Every weekday we are featuring one of these creators on our Facebook page, and the issues that person contributed to will be on sale for a whopping 50% off.  Make a note of the authors and artists you’re following and jump on these deals.  Some print issues are rare and getting scarcer, so nab them while you still can!

Here’s our line-up for the second week …

14th – 18th January 2019

Monday: Alex Reece Abbott, Issues 19 & 20

Alex Reece Abbott has consistently impressed in Pulp Literature’s short fiction contests. She’s an award-winning emerging writer working across genres, forms, and hemispheres. Follow her on Twitter @AlexReeceAbbott.

       

Tuesday: Alexis A. Hunter, Issue 12

Speculative fiction author Alexis A. Hunter has over 50 short story publications to her name through Shimmer, Apex, Fantastic Stories of the Imagination, and more.

Wednesday: Amy Fant , Issue 11

Amy Fant’s work has appeared in Driftwood Press, Weave, Nashville Review, Fiction Southeast, and Kentucky Review, among others. She’s originally from South Carolina and finished her MFA at Emerson College in Boston. After a whirlwind adventure in South Africa, Amy is putting her writing talent to good use as a lecturer at Middle Tennessee State University. Her short story, ‘Babies for Sale’, appeared in Issue 11.

Thursday: Anat Rabkin, Issues 9, 1317

Anat is a Vancouver-based artist and writer aspiring to tell stories that make you feel. As multi-talented as they come, Anat is a serial Pulp Literature contributor. Two of her short comics have appeared in Pulp Literature: ‘Forbidden Fruit’ in Issue 9, and ‘It Rained Then, Too’ in Issue 13. Her short story, ‘For the Love of Grey’, appeared in Issue 17. Follow her on Twitter @Kissless to keep up with her comic, Seraphim.

      

Friday: Andrea Lewis, Issue 10

Andrea Lewis writes short stories, essays, and prose poems from her home on Vashon Island, Washington. Her flash fiction piece, ‘Vellum’, was published in Issue 10 and will transform your understanding of what a sentence can be. To read more of her work, visit andrealewis.org.

Issue 10 small