The Art of Asking … and Offering

When you pass a busker and throw some change in the open guitar case, what are you paying for?  It could be for the good feeling of helping another human being; or it could be a gesture of gratitude, a ‘thank you’ for filling that corner of your day with music.

For me it’s often the latter, but there’s another motivation as well.  My coin in that case is a vote that says, “I like what you’re doing, please keep doing it, because I’m willing to pay you for it.”

Last year when we decided to launch a magazine to print the stories we love, this TED talk by the amazing Amanda Palmer was a large part of the inspiration.

viellaIt’s a vulnerable feeling to stand on the street corner with your hand outstretched.  When we ran our first Kickstarter campaign we weren’t just asking for your money, we were asking for your trust.  We had no white flower to hand you, and we hadn’t already filled your ears with music.  All we had were the reputations of great writers like CC Humphreys, JJ Lee, Susanna Kearsley and Joan MacLeod, and the promise of a year’s worth of fabulous stories.

One year on Amanda Palmer has published her first book, The Art of Asking: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Let People Help, and we have four beautiful issues of Pulp Literature that we’ve been proud to put into your hands.

We hope you liked the medley of stories we’ve brought to your doorstep.  Once more we are asking for your help, this time to publish the next four issues.  Lend us your support and we’ll be your troubadours, bringing you fabulous fiction four times throughout the next year, and for as long as there is a public that wants to pay for it.

Whether you can afford to back us to the tune of $1 or $1000, your pledge on the Kickstarter page is your vote.  It says “I like a good story, I want to see more of them published, and I’m willing to pay to make that happen.”

We thank you for your vote.

The art of asking

For more on Amanda Palmer’s book and the new model for arts funding, see this excellent essay in the New Statesman by Cory Doctorow.

 

 

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