Tag Archives: Tyner Gillies

2019 Year of Authors: Sept 9th – Sept 13th

It’s not every year you get to celebrate publishing 20 issues of genre-busting literature. We want our readers to reap the rewards, and our contributors to shine in the spotlight, so every week we are offering up a selection of deeply discounted past issues, based on one of the authors, poets, or artists whose work fills the magazine’s pages. Welcome to week 35 of Pulp Literature’s Year of Authors!

9th – 13th September 2019

Monday: Tais Teng, Issue 3, 6, 8, 9, 19

Tais Teng works as a writer, cover artist, illustrator and sculptor. He also paints murals and decors for theater. When he was a bit younger he wanted to become a starship pilot, but writing and drawing those places isn’t too bad.  He’s been the cover artist for four issues of Pulp Literature and his story ‘Growing up with Your Dead Sister’ appeared in Issue 8.

Issue 13 cover art by Tais TengIssue 8 cover art by Mel Anastasiou

Tuesday: Theric Jepson, Issue 6

Theric Jepson is author of the novel Byuck and the novella Perky Erect Nipples, neither of which feature as many naked women as you might expect. You can find him online by visiting thmazing.com, or by just googling “thmazing” and clicking at random. He lives in El Cerrito, California, with his wife, three sons, and an unholy convergence of snails.

Wednesday: Tobi Cogswell (Alfier), Issue 6

Tobi Alfier (formerly Cogswell) is a multiple Pushcart nominee and a Best of the Net nominee. Credits include  various journals in the US, UK, Sweden and Australia. In 2012 and 2013 she was short-listed for the Fermoy International Poetry Festival. In 2013 she received Honorable Mention for the Rachel Sherwood Poetry Prize. “Lapses & Absences” (Blue Horse Press), is her sixth and latest chapbook. She is the co-editor of San Pedro River Review.

 

Thursday: Trevor ShikazeIssue 2
Trevor Shikaze from Edmonton, Alberta, enjoys long walks on the beach, fine wines, cheap whisky, watery beer, free champagne, and hangovers. His turn-offs include cat people, dog people, and mole people.
 

 

Friday: Tyner Gillies, Issue 1
Tyner Gillies, author of the novel The Watch, lives in the Fraser Valley of BC with a girl who is far too good for him and two moderately chubby cats. He’s a full time lawman, a novice scotch drinker, and a bit of a meat head. Tyner won the 2013 Surrey International Writer’s Conference non-fiction writing contest with the gut-twisting, beautifully written ‘Blood in Her Hair.’  His humorous fantasy ‘Of Siege and Sword’ in our inaugural issue was of an entirely different tone, and we’re delighted to be publishing another light-hearted dark story ‘The Lord of Lawn Ornaments’ in Issue 24, coming out this fall.
 

 

Award Season!

We are pleased as punch to announce our nominations for the Pushcart Prize.  How did we pick them?  It was hard.  Have you even looked at a fantastic menu and couldn’t decide what to order?  Twice Sue’s had the pleasure of dining at renowned Vij’s restaurant in Vancouver.  Both times she asked the owner which dish he’d recommend, and his reply was the same:  how can a parent choose his favourite child?  As publishers, we find ourselves in a similarly impossible position trying to pick favourites, but by studying the inclinations of each prize, we recommend the stories we think stand the best chance of winning each competition.  The Pushcarts are geared to literary fiction, which we have in each issue, but we proved our cross-genre dedication by nominating a literary vampire story. (Think they’ll notice?) The competition is fierce for these awards, but we know these stories are gems. And win or lose, we trust the authors of these stories will feel how much we value them in our magazine.

Nominated for the Pushcart Prize 2015:Victorygirlbutterfly

We have also have suggested the following stories for Imaginarium 4, an anthology of Canadian Spec Fic by Chizine.

In addition, ‘Blackthorne & Rose: Agents of DIRE’ by KG McAbee has been submitted for a Bram Stoker Award.

Stay tuned for the announcement of our Journey Prize nominations.  And hey, all you members of the SFWA, now’s your chance to be a hero and nominate a favourite fantasy or science fiction story for a Nebula Award!  If you’d like a complete list of our stories in that genre, just let us know.  We’d also like to hear from you if there is one or more of our stories you think ought to be submitted for other prizes.

Finally, the estimable CC Humphreys has finished judging our very own Raven Cover Story Contest  and we’ll be announcing the winners on Monday.  To whet your appetite, here, in no particular order, is the list of finalists:

  • ‘The Hemisphere Stone’ by Mike Glyde
  • ‘Dear Louis’ by Sara Cedeno
  • ‘Claws In’ by Ace Baker
  • ‘Odd Jobs’ by KL Mabbs
  • ‘Family Relics’ by Katherine Wagner
  • ‘The Ravens’ by Anna Belkine
  • ‘The Inner Light’  by Krista Wallace
  • ‘The Jealous Valley’ by Kiril Lavarevski

Congratulations to all these authors and best of luck in the final judgment!

PULP pairings

Those of you who have been following Pulp Literature from its inception may have noticed a certain malty, hoppy flavour hereabouts.   It seems only right, therefore, that we play the part of good cicerones and offer you beer pairings to go with the fare in our first issue.

Where the Angels Wait by CC Humphreys.  Without a doubt the beer to quaff with this one is a cerveza, pronounced “thairvaitha”, and not from one of those ubiquitous bottles you find all over the liquor store shelves.  No, you need an Alhambra, served cold while you take refuge from the merciless Spanish sun in the shade of an orange tree.  Take care, though.  This one goes down so smooth you won’t notice you’re drunk till you stand and try to walk away.

Stella Ryman and the Case of the Third Option by Mel AnastasiouWhen drinking with Stella it doesn’t do to put on airs.  You’ll want a no-nonsense beer.  Nothing hoppy, nothing chilled, and certainly nothing with fruit in it.  A decent pint of ESB will do nicely, hand-drawn from a cask, if you please.

Only the Loons Know by SL Nickerson.  After the apocalypse it’ll be good to know university students.  They, if no-one else, will be back to making beer in no time.  The eclectic bunch of survivors will all have their own far-flung cultural ingredients to add to the mix, but whatever comes out of the vat will be quintessentially Canadian.  One only hopes they don’t use Lake Ontario water.

Of Siege and Sword by Tyner Gillies.  This is one you’ll want to drink with the lads.  Lager, and lots of it.

Glass Curtain by Sue Pieters.  Sophisticated, mature and bittersweet.  What better to match the floral overtones, the old- and new-world sensibilities, and the lingering poignant flavour of this story than a Westcoast IPA?

The Mechanics by Angela Melick.  A different kind of dystopia needs a different kind of beer.  We recommend a Japanese can.  Whether it’s super-dry or malty is your choice, but make sure it’s from a vending machine.

Allaigna’s Song: Overture by JM Landels.   Allaigna is underage, so only give her small beer, well watered.  Lauresa has exotic tastes and will drink something different every time: frambozen, wheat ale, kriek … surprise her.  But if you’re going to sit in a smoky tavern with Irdaign and hear the future told, you’ll need a well-aged stout to stiffen your spine.

Join us at the Launch Party on December 20th as we raise glasses of fine R&B Brewing Ale and toast these stories into life.

 

 

 

First issue first lines

As a teaser for our first issue, here are the first few lines from all the stories in issue 1.  See if you can match them with their authors!

  1. “Live or die, live or die! That’s all anybody does around here. For once, I wish somebody would come up with a third option.”
  2. Keld tensed as he heard the clinking footsteps and huffing breath of the enemy.  It wasn’t the anticipation of the coming fight that made him tense, it was the bloody hallway.
  3. “Failed equipment located. Searching … no procedure available.
  4. Sitting on the edge of the bed now, listening.  A door opened, shut, someone has come and gone, that much is certain.
  5. If you walk down the grand staircase of Castle Osthegn, you will see a family portrait.
  6. “Why is the grass always greener in Sally’s yard?” I ask this out loud, and my husband takes my question literally.
  7. You must understand, post-apocalypse Hamilton couldn’t get much worse than pre-apocalypse Hamilton.

Here are the stories they come from:

a. Where the Angels Wait, by CC Humphreys

b. Stella Ryman and the Case of the Third Option, by Mel Anastasiou

c. Only the Loons Know, by SL Nickerson

d. Allaigna’s Song: Overture, by JM Landels

e. Glass Curtain, by Sue Pieters

f. The Mechanics, by Angela Melick

g. Of Seige and Sword, by Tyner Gillies

Post your answers in the comments below.  The first person to correctly match all seven will win a signed limited edition JJ Lee paper doll, drawn by the amazing Kris Sayer.

A snippet of JJ's costumes -- now in glorious colour!
A snippet of JJ’s costumes — now in glorious colour!

And of course, if don’t guess correctly but are still jonesing for that doll, you can pledge at the $50 level on our kickstarter page.  There are still a few left, but you need to hurry — the campaign only runs till November 5th!