Tag Archives: Robert J Sawyer

'The Story Teller' by Melissa Mary Duncan

Issue 12 launching at VCON 41

Autumn_2016_cover smallThe Autumn 2016 issue of Pulp Literature will be hot off the presses in time for VCON 41 at the Sheraton Guildford in Surrey this weekend.  Author Rhea Rose and cover artist Melissa Mary Duncan will be on site and available to sign copies, as will many other previous authors and artists such as CC Humphreys, Robert J Sawyer, Eileen Kernaghan, Anat Rabkin, Laura Kostur, Susan Pieters, and JM Landels.  And, as a special bonus, our Raven Contest judge Brenda Carre will be there — this is your chance to pick her brain and discover what she loves to read!

Issue 7 coverRhea, CC, Robert, Eileen, Brenda, and Jen all have readings and panels throughout the weekend (and Jen will be picking up swords as usual at the Academie Duello demo on Saturday evening), so be sure look up their schedules and track them down.

Issue 5

Issue 5

And of course visit our table at any time throughout the weekend.  Admission to the vendors’ room is free and we’d love to see you there!Winter-2014-cover-proof1

walker

Creative Ink Festival!

Calling all writers and readers in the BC Lower Mainland! This weekend is your chance to network and learn from a friendly and talented group of authors and publishers at the Creative Ink Festival.  For a mere $80, enjoy three days of programming and social events aimed to get you involved, inspired, and enlightened in your creative projects.  Jen, Mel and Sue are excited because this is the first time in three years all three editors will be teaching at the same conference.  Hot tip: don’t miss our blue pencil sessions, where you can tap into our expertise for fifteen minutes! Here’s our schedule:

poster-425x55Friday 6th May
1pm: How to Swim through Rejections panel with Sue plus Ella Beaumont, ER Brown, Melanie Dixon, Claire Humphrey
2pm: Hiring the Right Editor with Sue, Jen & Mel
4pm: Getting Started panel with Sue plus Galen Dara, Christel Bodenbender, Caitlin Hicks & Matt Hughes.

Saturday 7th May
9am: Blue Pencil sessions with Sue
10am: Blue Pencil sessions with Mel
11am: SF Noir with Mel plus Robert J Sawyer, Randy McCharles and Tom Wright
4pm: Blue Pencil sessions with Jen
6pm: Stress Management for Creatives panel with Mel & Sue plus Danika Dinsmore, Aviva Bel’Harold, Devon Boorman & Claire Humphrey
7pm: Pulp Literature Reading Event with Sue, Jen and other Pulp Lit authors
8pm: Group autograph session

Issue 7 cover

Bring your copy of Issue 7 to the signing event!

Sunday 8th May
9am: An Editor’s Dream panel with Sue plus Katrina Archer, Ella Beaumont, & ER Brown
9am: What To Do When the Creative Well is Bone Dry panel with Jen plus Aviva Bel’Harold, Mel Anastasiou,  Dani Duck, Rhea Rose, Jessica Steiner
1pm: Real Life Superwomen panel with Jen plus Kristene Perron, Lisa Gemino, Sandra Wickham, and Setsu Uzume
4pm: Live Action Slush panel with Jen plus Mark Teppo, Matt Hughes, Tod McCoy, Randy McCharles, Ella Beaumont and Ian Alexander Martin

Spring shipment

Snag a copy of Issue 10 with Carol Berg’s ‘Uncanonical Murder’ at our table

Check out the full schedule for all the other fabulous panels and presentations too.  And of course you can visit us at the Pulp Literature book table at any time in the vendors’ hall, which is open to the public.  Attendees, don’t forget to look in your conference bag for a coupon entitling you to a free eBook or $5 off a print issue of Pulp Literature.  See you there!

supportingchars

Crafting Supporting Characters: Robert Sawyer and GRR Martin Show How It’s Done

I’m a great admirer of authors who make exceptional use of supporting characters.  A cast of extras is fun to write, of course.  And supporting characters can say with charm, or the complete lack of it, what the character wouldn’t.  But their magic goes deeper than that. Here are three steps farther than snappy dialogue…Sawyer cropped

1. We should hear a supporting character state the theme of the story early on, as in Robert Sawyer’s brilliant “Fallen Angel”, where the father tells his daughter Angela that there was nothing to fear. “We’ll be so high up we’ll catch God’s eye.’’ But she does fear, and the story turns on her fear and what she does because of it.

2.  Supporting characters force the protagonist to show the readers his heroic qualities in contrast with their less heroic aspects. They make sure we don’t miss the hero’s flaws, either. Take a look at the many Brothers who have taken the Black on the Wall in Martin’s Game of Thrones series. Their leader Jon Snow is so remarkably steadfast and true that it takes an army of supporting characters to bring out his weaknesses.

3. Supporting characters at their best force the protagonist – and antagonist – to make choices they would not have faced on their own, no matter how stubborn or brave they might be.  I was just re-reading (for about the fiftieth time since I got it in my stocking at fourteen) Bel Kaufman’s amazing Up the Down Staircase. There’s not a character in there that doesn’t force young teacher Sylvia Barrett to make agonizing choices.  That’s pretty rare craft in a book told through notes, letters, memos, and scribbles on the backboard.

What can your supporting characters do for your protagonist?

 Robert Sawyer. Fallen Angel. Pulp Literature Press, Issue 7. Vancouver, 2014.

GRR Martin. A Game of Thrones. Bantam, 1996.

Bel Kaufman. Up the Down Staircase. Avon Books, New York. 1964.small singer copy

 

 

Issue 7 feature author: Robert J Sawyer

Untitled-2Canadian readers will especially recognize the name of our feature author for Issue 7 as a leading name in science fiction: Robert J Sawyer has won the Hugo, Nebula, John W. Campbell, Arthur Ellis, and Aurora awards, and with good reason. His books are intelligent and dynamic, introspective and fast-paced. They are true to the calling of great science fiction, seeing our present sharply through the mirror of the future.

Sawyer’s latest book, Red Planet Blues, is unique for its genre crossing, combining traditional pulp genre elements in the futuristic setting of Mars. The novel begins in classic detective fashion, so much so that I can’t help but see fishnet stockings and film noir shadows crossing the set as a hot babe walks in to the only detective agency on Mars to ask a private eye to locate her missing husband…

Before you rush off to buy the book (which I recommend), don’t forget to purchase your issue of Issue 7, to read another cross-genre Sawyer story, ‘Fallen Angel.’ It’s a fantasy story with gothic tones, as a young girl tries to worm out of a deal with the devil. Issues will be mailed out this week! Or come and purchase a copy at our Issue 7 launch party Monday night at the Wolf and Hound pub — we’re set to enjoy ourselves with a beer and a bit of storytelling. What could be a better way to enjoy summer?

 

 

 

Canvention Congratulations!

Issue 5

Issue 5

Congratulations to next issue’s feature author, Eileen Kernaghan, who netted an Aurora Award for her poem “Night Journey: West Coast” published in Tesseracts Seventeen by EDGE Publishing!

The Aurora’s were presented last weekend at VCon 39 / Canvention 34 in Surrey, and it was a great weekend for Pulp Lit.   Not only did we launch issue 4 with authors KL Mabbs and Ace Baker, our issue 1 and 5 cover artist, the supremely talented Melissa Mary Duncan was an Artist Guest of Honour and an Aurora nominee.   The fact that another Pulp Lit author, David Clink (‘The Lady in White’, ‘Death Smile’, Pulp Literature Issue 2) took second place in the poem category was icing on the cake.  And to top it all off, issue 7 feature author Robert J Sawyer was one of the eight inaugural inductees into the Canadian Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame.  Congratulations all!

Beer Fairie by Melissa Mary Duncan

Beer Fairie by Melissa Mary Duncan

It wasn’t all books and writing of course.  If you dropped into the Academie Duello demo on Saturday afternoon you would have seen the authors of ‘The Wolf’, Kimberleigh Roseblade and JM Landels, in a friendly sword and buckler match, while Susan Pieters (‘Glass Curtain’, ‘Capture of the Muse’, ‘Invisible’, ‘Below the Knee’) chatted with Stormtroopers, angels and inquisitors at the Pulp Lit table.

Rapier with JM Landels & Gareth Antle

Rapiers at noon with JM Landels & Gareth Antle

 

We had a fabulous time at VCon, and we hope to see you again their next year.  Be sure to subscribe, either here on the website or through our Kickstarter campaign, so as not to miss Eileen Kernaghan’s and Robert J Sawyer’s stories in upcoming issues!

Issue 4 cover

Join us at VCon

Issue 4 coverWe’ll be launching our Autumn issue at VCon 39, Vancouver’s own Science Fiction and Fantasy Convention.  The booklaunch takes place this Friday October 3rd at 7pm at the Sheraton in Surrey BC  on 15269 104th Avenue.  Pulp Literature authors and artists in attendance will include Eileen Kernaghan, JJ Lee, Ace Baker, JM Landels, Susan Pieters the Canvention 34 Artist Guest-of-Honour Melissa Mary Duncan!

Ours are not the only books on offer.  Other authors include Jennifer Lott, Lynda Williams, Roxanne Barbour, Casey Wolf, Silvia Moreno-Garcia, T.S. Bazelli, Lorna Suzuki, and Randy McCharles.  Plus there will be readings from David Weber,  Marty Chan, Linda DeMeulemeester, Tony Stark, Virginia Stark, Bruce Heard, Julie McGalliard, Joseph Picard, Katrina Archer, Danika Dinsmore, Graham Darling, dvs Duncan, and JA McLachlan.

Pencils for page 5 of 'The Wolf'

The VCon Booklaunch evening is open to the public, so bring some friends, enjoy the readings and do some early gift shopping amid the wonderful selection of books.

The Aurora Awards are also that evening, and our two-time cover artist Melissa Mary Duncan is up for one, as is our issue 7 feature author, Robert J Sawyer.  As well there are dozens of other readings, panels and workshops throughout the weekend.  Come and visit us in Artists’ Alley where original pages of “The Wolf” will be on display, and see Melissa’s beautiful art in person at the Art Show.

See you there!

'Fondly Remembered Magic' by Melissa Mary Duncan

‘Fondly Remembered Magic’ by Melissa Mary Duncan