Tag Archives: Pulp Literature Issue 15

Nicholas Christian, ‘A Wassail in Ink’

We are delighted to publish Nicholas Christian’s poem ‘A Wassail in Ink’ in Issue 15 of Pulp Literature.  We are even more delighted that he has provided another version of the poem, which he has agreed to publish here on the website.

A Wassail in Ink

by Nicholas Christian

Here is one beginning: an Ocean of Vietnam;
bottom rim stiff with starch grinding like rough glass
against an old belt buckle, eyes sweeping and moving
in rhythm through the dark of a stone spiral street.

And there the cavalier waited, iron-red mouth brushing
your waist and Avery Colt laughed into beer with October
promises before the night church of Kansas knew even spoiled honey
is sweet in black heels high under sconces of electric tallow.

Our canoe was carved for sinking, certain your wet shoes remember
how to walk into the dusk of an old stranger’s bread, and gun-fire
has come to mean tasting the vanilla whorl of water lilies.

And some braveries are the old tears stranded and hungry
given to island sand, words taken by the wind returned possessions
with the rain, grown thick and resonant as stretching pelicans—
we’ve landed on Bluebeard’s birch table, sure in opening one more door

the joys of hearing Rumi ask what have I ever lost by dying?
What choice but to sentence shining with fat our piles of bones

to the burning wood; now there is space for the tapestry of your back
to fit into my hand—this learning language through the body
sits so close to the future there is only the dance of it.

Which is all to say: these places are maps black from all this spilled ink
collecting in my cup full of little crows I’ve brought to your lips,
meaning nothing more than we are seven words written when not looking.

We think the poem is superb in both its forms.  What do you think?  You can find Issue 15 here if you don’t already have it.  We’d love to hear from you.

Nicholas Christian’s poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in TAB, The Lindenwood Review, Cobalt Review, Rat’s Ass Review, Off the Coast, Poetry Quarterly, Poetry City, USA, and elsewhere. His work explores the significance of world mythology and initiatory rites, and further what it means to live in a modern place and age where they are sorely needed while frequently absent.  He will be travelling to Goa, India in February 2018 to take part in a panel on South American mythology for Roots, a celebration of Portuguese language and literature.

 

 

Monsters in the Classroom with Adam Golub

Congratulations to Adam Golub on the release of Monsters in the Classroom: Essays on Teaching What Scares Us (McFarland 2017). Adam, with Heather Richardson Hayton, is  co-editor. “The contributors discuss the implications of inviting fearsome creatures into the classroom, showing how they work to create compelling narratives and provide students a framework for analyzing history, culture, and everyday life.” More here.

Adam’s short story ‘The Pool Guy’ was  Brenda Carre’s choice as first runner up in Pulp Literature’s  2016 Raven Short Story Contest. Here’s a taste …

The Pool Guy
by Adam Golub

Ty took a break from sexting Maddie to ask the pool guy about the leaf blower guy.

“I heard someone attacked him with a golf club,” said Ty.

“That’s right,” said the pool guy.  “Someone just walked up and cracked him, Goodfellas style.  Jesús tried to fight back with the leaf blower, and supposedly there was a duel for a few seconds, all King Arthur and shit, but police say this maniac was on a mission, he was hulking, all Rage-Virused out.  Jesús never stood a chance.  He’s got a skull fracture, man.  Lacerations on his arms.  Teeth are all busted up.”

“That’s terrible,” Ty said as his phone chimed.

And then I climb on top of you like a jockey on his favourite horse.  

Maddie was a simile sexter.

…  Read the rest in Pulp Literature Issue 15

Adam Golub with Zombies, in the News

Monsters in the Classroom: Teaching Can Be a Scream, CSUF News Service, August 1, 2017.

“Got a monstrous concept to teach next semester?

There’s a zombie for that.

Inviting creatures into the classroom helps students analyze history, culture and everyday life…” more here

Zombies and the Professor Who Teaches Them, Yes Weekly, June 27, 2017.

At Guilford College, the walking dead have been feasting on students who don’t cooperate to defend themselves. This is not a game or a Halloween zombie walk, the blood-splattered mayhem is a serious academic exercise requiring problem-solving, critical thinking and trust. More here…

About Adam Golub

Adam Golub is an American Studies professor who teaches courses on literature, childhood, popular culture, and monsters at California State University, Fullerton. His stories have appeared in The Bookends Review, 101 Fiction, The Sirens Call, and Winamop.

 

Fabulous Door Prizes at Pulp Literature Summer Launch

Join us this Monday, July 10th from 6-9 pm at Steamworks Brew Pub in Gastown, as we celebrate our summer launch of  Pulp Literature Issue 15, Summer 2017, and Allaigna’s Song: Overture, by JM Landels.  There will be author readings, book signings, good food, good beer, and good cheer.

The launch is free to attend; we only ask that you RSVP.

Eventbrite - Pulp Literature Summer Launch

Fabulous Door Prizes

Be sure to print and bring your ticket to enter for door prizes:

  • Your choice between swords or horses: a duelling for two date at Academie Duello or a riding for two date at Red Colt Equestrian Co-op.  (Duelling for two can also take place at Red Colt, if you prefer an outdoor setting).
  • A critique of up to 5000 words of your manuscript by editor Susan Pieters.
  • Colouring Paradise: A Renaissance-Inspired Colouring Book by artist Mel Anastasiou
  • A grab bag of Pulp Literature back issues, and more!

Have a Drink on Us

Reserve signed personalized copies of one or both books on the Eventbrite ticket page and we’ll buy you a beer (or the tipple of your choice) at the launch.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Pulp Literature Summer Launch
Monday 10 July 2017, 6 – 9pm
Steamworks Brewing Co
375 Water St, Vancouver BC
Eventbrite - Pulp Literature Summer Launch

Brenda Carre, Magic and Great Storytelling in Issue 15

What a pleasure to read Brenda Carre’s Gret in Issue 15.  She gives us the unique voice of a talented young vagabond who will risks her soul against magical forces to save a world that’s been anything but kind to her:

My mam always told me there’s three ways to prosper best and all begin with L.

Location’s one. No prospering’s ever done by thief or witch if the job begins in the wrong place or time.  Lissome tongue was next.  No matter how much wisdom a gal had to her, good learning didn’t go far if she couldn’t talk her way out of a bad deal.  And last was Lightning touch. That meant the effortless sliding of nimble fingers in-and-out of pockets without being cotched.

With these words Brenda Carre takes us straight into a world of magic, terror and transformation.  This first chapter, complete in itself, leaves us hoping to read the novel as soon as humanly, or magically, possible.

A new project on her website at brendacarre.com, is a story tantalizingly titled ‘Rats at Sea’ in the forthcoming anthology, No Humans Allowed, edited by John Helfers. “Will ships’ rats desert an English Frigate under fire from the French during the Napoleonic Wars? Not if their leader is a doughty young rat named Willy Topper and not if he needs to save the life of his one true love.”

More about Issue 15, in which iconoclasts and troublemakers run amok …

 

Happy International Women’s Day

I love our cover art.  For me, one of the greatest joys of the magazine is finding and choosing paintings to wrap our words in.  But I’m always a bit sad when the necessary banners and text cover up some of the beautiful images.

So to celebrate International Women’s day,  we offer you a sneak peek of the cover art for Pulp Literature Issue 15, Summer 2017 by the amazing S. Ross Browne.  Here is The Huntress, in her full undecorated glory.  Enjoy!

The Huntress, by S. Ross Browne.

Find more of Ross’s wonderful paintings here.