Tag Archives: Nicola Aime

2019 Year of Authors: 22 – 26 July

It’s another week dominated by the poets! Week 28 of Pulp Literature’s Year of Authors starts out strong with two Magpie Poetry Contest winners, stays steady in the middle with two poets from across the pond, and finishes with the odd woman out — though something tells us that Pat revels in being the outlier.

22nd – 26th July 2019

Monday: Nicola Aimé, Issue 12

Nicola Aimé writes about the spaces in between, those places where people touch but never entirely find each other: immigration with its sacrificial gains, the ambiguous embraces of tango, the tangled demands of being a woman in the modern era, the vast failures of justice in an indifferent world. Her work has always been among words—stories, screenplays, editing, ESL, and literacy. Poetry arrived unbidden and took her by surprise. It continues to keep her curious and is her route both into herself and out into the world.

Issue 12 cover by Melissa Mary Duncan

Tuesday: Oak Morse, Issue 16

Oak Morse is a poet, spoken word artist, speaker and teacher who has travelled and toured across the Southeast as a performing artist as well as a teacher of performance poetry. He now is becoming recognized for his recent literary works, which aim to bring attention to a speech disorder known as ‘cluttering’, which Oak has worked tirelessly to overcome. Oak Morse now speaks and serves as an ambassador for cluttering and writes poetry which seeks to engage readers and immerse them into the cluttering experience. Oak currently lives in Lawrenceville, Georgia, where he works on his poetry collection titled When the Tongue Goes Bad.

Issue 16 cover art by Akem

Wednesday: Oscar Windsor-Smith, Issue 7

Oscar Windsor-Smith writes fiction, creative non-fiction, non-fiction and poetry from his home in Hertfordshire, UK. His stories have been finalists in the New York City Midnight Short Story Challenge and the University of Plymouth short fiction competitions.

Thursday: PA Levy, Issue 11
Born in East London but now residing amongst the hedge mumblers of rural Suffolk, PA Levy has been published in many magazines, from A cappella Zoo to Zygote In My Coffee and stations in between. He is also a founding member of the Clueless Collective.
 

Friday: Pat Flewwelling, Issue  14
By day, Pat is a senior business analyst at a major telecommunications company; by evening, she works at a brand-new micropress; on weekends, she runs Myth Hawker Travelling Bookstore; and by night, she fights ninja vampires using nothing but radioactive garlic and weapons-grade sarcasm. And sometime between Never O’Clock and the Second Tuesday of Next Week, Pat writes short stories and novels, including Helix: Blight of Exiles, Helix: Plague of Ghouls, and Helix: Scourge of Bones.  Her story ‘The Handler’ won the 2016 Raven Short Story contest.
 

Congratulate Magpie Winner, Nicola Aime!

Magpie Award final judge Diane Tucker has revealed the three gems which will have everyone standing in line to purchase their Issue 12 copy of Pulp Literature (so order it now)!  Our winners spanned the continent, from Newfoundland to California, yet we are secretly pleased that this contest (judged blind) was won by a local Vancouver poet.  And mainly we’re glad because we’ll get to raise a toast to her in person at the book launch!  Without further ado,  Diane’s comments:

All the shortlisted poems contain clever and even beautiful imagery, emotion precisely and originally expressed, and an extraordinary amount of chutzpah. There isn’t a timid piece in the bunch.  But these three, in my opinion, do the work best.

Magpie Award ($500) to Nicola Aime for  “Dumb Love”
Judged by the contest’s own standard –  “a fusion of musicality, imagery, feeling, and thought” – “Dumb Love” is the winner in this group of poems. Every syllable in it serves the music and the rhythm and the story. The poem’s sustained metaphor, or family of metaphors, is never cheesily over-used or descends into mere punning. The poem’s perfect juggle of swooning passion and subtle and sardonic humour makes it a love poem truer than most to actual human love.  I feel it wants to be recited with a resigned smile.  And through all of this it sustains its music.  It is the most seamless of the entries, the most polished and fully-realized piece of work.

First Runner-Up: ($50) Katie Vautour for “Military Survival Training”
This is a dense, stony, jagged poem, longish but laser-focused, patient and cold and terrifying.  It’s a controlled, drawn-out pain, like a night of sleep spent clenching one’s jaw. Waking doesn’t make it better… It’s going to stay lodged in my head and make me think twice before I eat rabbit again.

Second Runner-Up: ($50) Marnie Eldridge for “Man.hunt”
Almost a complete contrast to “Military Survival Training”, “Man.hunt” is a hugely loose, flailing, overflowing tsunami of a poem.  It works as well as it does because its seemingly rambling passages have a fine strong thread running through them… Its chaotic music and gorgeous, determined fierceness sustain the patient reader.

Congratulations again to all our fine poets, and especially to Nicola!