Tag Archives: Michael Kamakana

Pulp Literature at When Words Collide

Calgary, we know we don’t say this often enough but … we’re coming to see you!

A lot has happened since our last visit; we published a debut novel from Cowtowner, Michael Kamakana; we put out several new issues; and by the time we touchdown at YYC for When Words Collide, Matthew Hughes’s magnum opus, What the Wind Brings, will have landed as well.  We’d love to catch up with you, so if you find yourself at Delta Calgary South for the 2019 WWC conference, stop by the Fireside room on Saturday (August 10th) at 2 pm.

In addition to Pulp Literature Presents, Jen Landels and Jessisca Fabrizius will be presenting at the following sessions:

Friday

  • 3:00pm – Hiring the Right Editor
  • 5:00pm – Common Manuscript Problems
  • 6:00pm – Storytelling with Swordplay

Saturday

  • 12:00pm – Pitch session
  • 2:00pm – Pulp Literature Presents
  • 8:00pm – Autograph Session

Sunday

  • 11:00am – David vs Goliath: Writing the mis-matched fight scent
  • 12:00pm – Live Action Slush – High Fantasy
  • 1:00pm – Cover Art Trends
  • 3:00pm – Live Action Slush – Urban Fantasy
  • 4:00pm – Blue Pencil Cafe
  • 5:00pm – Literary vs Speculative Fiction

Some of the other Pulp Literature authors  in attendance at WWC include Jasmin Nyack, Michael Kamakana, Robert J Sawyer, Robert Runté, and Pat Flewelling.  We hope to see you there as well!

Pulp Literature Presents
Saturday 10 Aug, 2:00 – 3:00pm
Fireside Room,  Delta Calgary South

RSVP here

2019 Year of Authors: 1 – 5 July

This week is one of national celebration for our Canadian and American readers and we don’t mind celebrating with stellar savings on seven issues this week. Only ten weeks remain in our year of celebration, so let week 26 commence with a bang as we raise a glass to friends, flags, and fireworks!

24th – 28th June 2019

Monday: Melissa Mary DuncanIssue 1, 512 & Allaigna’s Song: Overture

Fantasy artist and illustrator Melissa Mary Duncan lives in New Westminster, BC, with her husband, author dvs Duncan. An avid historic re-enactor, neo-Edwardian, and wishful thinker, Melissa has a passion for life, learning, and the creative process. She has had numerous solo exhibitions and her art has found homes in private collections from Japan to Great Britain. Her book, Faye—the Art of Melissa Mary Duncan, was released in 2013 and is available for sale through her website along with her 2019 calendar. Melissa was our frst cover artist. Her paintings The Beer Fairy, Fondly Remembered Magic, and The Storyteller have graced the covers of Pulp Literature and she is the cover artist for Allaigna’s Song: Overture from Pulp Literature Press as well.

Issue 12 cover by Melissa Mary Duncan

Tuesday: Michael Patrick Eltrich, Issue 4

Michael is a writer and an architect who, through his essays, short stories and longer works, explores the ways in which lives are forever changed by love, war and travel.  His book-length project, “The Wars I Fought”, is a recollection of his experiences as a 21-year-old infantryman in Quang Ngai province, Viet Nam, and his return there forty years later, hoping to find peace among people who, like him, have led lives marked by the desolate savagery of war. Michael lives in Denver with Capt. Blackie and Chloë, whose amazing feats have never been seen on Facebook or Youtube. His poem ‘Autumnal Equinox’ was a runner-up in our inaugural Magpie Award for Poetry in 2014.

Wednesday: Michael Kamakana, Issue 19, Advent

Michael Kamakana is a Calgary-based novelist with a talent for storytelling that holds readers rapt. He is a prolifc writer who works almost non-stop to get his work out of his head and into print.  His first novel Advent was excerpted in Issue 19 last year, and made its way into the world as a full novel in early 2019.  

Thursday: Michael G Ryan, Issue 11

Michael G Ryan has been an editor for over 25 years, beginning with the National Council of Teachers of English and currently as Publisher for Skull Island, an imprint of Privateer Press. After decades of writing short stories and novels, only to bottom-drawer as many as seven novels for some future time, he’s finally begun to submit them for consideration.

     

Friday: Michelle Barker, Issue  18

Michelle Barker is an award-winning author whose works include a poetry chapbook, a YA fantasy novel, and a picture book. Michelle also works as an editor and workshop leader. She lives in Vancouver, British Columbia. When she isn’t writing, Michelle does totally normal things like triathlons for fun, sailing, and traveling the world.  Her story ‘MVP’ was the winner of the 2017 SiWC Storyteller’s Award.

ADVENT has launched!

It’s a new year and we’re amping up our productivity with five new novels set for release in 2019! First among these is Advent by Michael Kamakana. We’ve been teasing our readers with this release for quite some time, but the day has finally come… Advent is now available for purchase on our website and Amazon!

In honour of this momentous occasion, and to get a feel for the author and the novel, here’s an interview with Michael Kamakana, originally published along side an excerpt of the novel in Issue 19.

Feature Interview

Michael Kamakana

Pulp Literature: What drew you to writing science fiction in the first place?
Michael Kamakana: I read SF as a youth—award winners, names like Clarke, Le Guin, Dick, Lem. I admired scientists like my father. I knew I myself would not be a scientist as my
interest in math and physics was… time to sleep. I was interested in fantastic escape that I could imagine possible.

PL: What titles and authors inspired you in the early days?
MK: Fountains of Paradise by Clarke, then Left Hand of Darkness by Le Guin, then The Man in the High Castle by Dick, then Neuromancer by Gibson, then The Snow Queen by de Vinge. First non-SFwould be The Great Gatsby by Fitzgerald, A Farewell to Arms by Hemingway, then Spring Snow by Mishima, then In the Labyrinth by Robbe-Grillet, then The Name of the Rose by Eco, then If on a Winter’s Night a Traveller by Calvino, then The Woman in the Dunes
by Kobo Abe, then…

PL: What kind of philosophy books do you read?
MK: I read almost entirely ‘continental’ philosophers of the 20th Century. My favourites at the moment are Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Edmund Husserl, Henri Bergson, Gilles Deleuze.

PL: You and your protagonist both survive a coma. How does your experience with trauma influence your storytelling?
MK: I always feel that when I truly understand any teaching or experience is when I can write a definitive story inspired by it. For now I keep writing, I keep hoping that someday I will understand the coma.

PL: You call the stories ‘essays.’ Why is that? Do you feel that each section is a separate topic?
MK: Well, the ‘reset’ and ‘reserve’ sections came first, and I was inspired by Munif’s ‘Endings’ to use the collective pronouns of ‘we’ and ‘they.’ Gradually both collapsing into ‘some people’, they have generalized, removed, clinical renderings of the times, not much identifiable personal psychology. I think ‘essays’ could be thought ‘fictions’ like Jorge Luis Borges.

PL: You’re a prolific writer. Do you work on more than one novel at a time?
MK: Actually I have about seven works at various stages and interest, with more ideas percolating.

PL: Did you spend time in Hawai’i as a child? How has this affected the
point of view of the narrator of your novel?
MK: I went to the islands about every winter as a child. We lived on the windward side of Oahu for a year in high school, and Father was working at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa. I still go every February to my mom’s hometown, Waimea, on the island of Kaua’i. I can pronounce words in Hawai’ian but cannot converse. I guess I am multicultural as my background is usually one of the first things to learn about me. But I am fortunate that in Canada I look mostly like a dark white guy, whereas in Hawai’i most people recognize me as part Hawai’ian. So, I have never faced much racism here in Canada. I always identified with the ‘Indians’ in Westerns, with indigenous peoples anywhere. And this work was inspired by reading Red Gold by Hemming, which recounts what happened when the Spanish and Portuguese contacted Brazilian indigenes. I just decided to reverse polarities and think of us humans as the technologically primitive and the aliens as the invaders.

Only the start is set in Hawai’i. Most of the essays are not localized as generic North American. The biographical passages are many places. As a beginning, I remember the fear of nuclear war coming to end everything on a beautiful day in Waimea, so this Advent is a different end of the world.

PL: Did you always want to be a writer?
MK:I knew I was going to be an artist of some sort, only gradually did I realize it was going to be writing. Father’s elder sister is an author, Father’s younger sister was a visual artist, so this has always been possible, valued, and I suppose reading the first story in my aunt’s first collection clarified my desires to do narrative prose. On the other, I have for many years avoided using my family as material because that had upset Father early on in his sister’s work.

PL: Do you have any hopes that Advent will change the way people think about
their lives, about aliens, about our many assumptions?
MK: I hope readers are entertained, are even just momentarily inspired to see themselves and all other humans from an ironic perspective, an existential and historical attitude.

PL: Did the process of writing Advent change the way you felt about yourself
as a coma survivor?
MK: Actually the change developed during the writing: I knew the biographical sections would come down to ‘he’ then ‘I’, but only discovered what the aliens want at about the same time I wrote it. I have always had high expectations of myself and limited beliefs in myself, so I am first happy it will be published, then reconciled somewhat to the losses of the coma. Basically, like the aliens decide: I do not know what I would be if not an author.

Get Advent on sale till February 15th and be among the first to read this stunning debut novel.