Tag Archives: Magpie Award

Treasures in the nest: The Magpie Shortlist

Our tireless poetry editor Daniel Cowper has been up late every night for the past weeks, reading and re-reading the wonderful poems that our Magpie gathered this year.  The finalists have been passed onto judge Renée Saklikar and we will announce her findings next week.  In the meantime, here are the shortlisted poets:

Angela Rebrec
Cara Waterfall
Glenn Pape
Leah Komar
Natalie Southworth
Oak Morse
Susan Alexander
Troy Turner
Trudi Benford

Congratulations to all of you, and double congrats to Trudi Benford who has two poems in the running.  Best of luck in the final round!

The Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize is currently open for entries until June 15th.  To stay abreast of all our contest openings, be sure to sign up for our free monthly newsletter.

Introducing Renée Saklikar, the Magpie Award Judge

It is our pleasure to introduce the judge for this year’s Magpie Award for Poetry, Surrey BC’s Poet Laureate Renée Sarojini Saklikar.

Renée Sarojini Saklikar writes thecanadaproject, a life-long poem chronicle.  Work from the project appears in journals, anthologies and chapbooks.  Renée’s first book, children of air india, un/authorized exhibits and interjections, (Nightwood Editions, 2013) won the 2014 Canadian Authors Association Award for poetry and was a finalist for the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Award.

Renée is currently a mentor and instructor for Simon Fraser University, and co-founder of the poetry reading series, Lunch Poems at SFU.  With Wayde Compton, Renée co-edited The Revolving City: 51 Poems and the Stories Behind Them (Anvil Press/SFU Public Square, 2015).  She is currently at work on the long poem, “Thot-J-Bap”, excerpts of which can be found in Eleven Eleven, The Capilano Review, DUSIE and The Rusty Toque, as well as in chapbooks published by Nous-Zot and above/ground presses.

Renée is the inaugural Poet Laureate for the City of Surrey and the 2017 UBC Okanagan Writer in Residence.  She collects poems about bees.

We are delighted to have Renée onboard as the Magpie Award judge. Thank you, Renée!

The 4th annual Magpie Award for Poetry is open until April 15th.  Contest guidelines  here.

Congratulate Magpie Winner, Nicola Aime!

Magpie Award final judge Diane Tucker has revealed the three gems which will have everyone standing in line to purchase their Issue 12 copy of Pulp Literature (so order it now)!  Our winners spanned the continent, from Newfoundland to California, yet we are secretly pleased that this contest (judged blind) was won by a local Vancouver poet.  And mainly we’re glad because we’ll get to raise a toast to her in person at the book launch!  Without further ado,  Diane’s comments:

All the shortlisted poems contain clever and even beautiful imagery, emotion precisely and originally expressed, and an extraordinary amount of chutzpah. There isn’t a timid piece in the bunch.  But these three, in my opinion, do the work best.

Magpie Award ($500) to Nicola Aime for  “Dumb Love”
Judged by the contest’s own standard –  “a fusion of musicality, imagery, feeling, and thought” – “Dumb Love” is the winner in this group of poems. Every syllable in it serves the music and the rhythm and the story. The poem’s sustained metaphor, or family of metaphors, is never cheesily over-used or descends into mere punning. The poem’s perfect juggle of swooning passion and subtle and sardonic humour makes it a love poem truer than most to actual human love.  I feel it wants to be recited with a resigned smile.  And through all of this it sustains its music.  It is the most seamless of the entries, the most polished and fully-realized piece of work.

First Runner-Up: ($50) Katie Vautour for “Military Survival Training”
This is a dense, stony, jagged poem, longish but laser-focused, patient and cold and terrifying.  It’s a controlled, drawn-out pain, like a night of sleep spent clenching one’s jaw. Waking doesn’t make it better… It’s going to stay lodged in my head and make me think twice before I eat rabbit again.

Second Runner-Up: ($50) Marnie Eldridge for “Man.hunt”
Almost a complete contrast to “Military Survival Training”, “Man.hunt” is a hugely loose, flailing, overflowing tsunami of a poem.  It works as well as it does because its seemingly rambling passages have a fine strong thread running through them… Its chaotic music and gorgeous, determined fierceness sustain the patient reader.

Congratulations again to all our fine poets, and especially to Nicola!

Magpie Top 10 Shortlist!

Congratulations to these wonderful poets for being selected as top picks for our Magpie Prize!  This is an impressive pool of talent, and we are honoured to have such an embarrassment of riches in our contest.  We will unveil the winner on Thursday, so stay tuned!  Our poets, in random order:

Jed Myerssmall magpie
Daniel Aristi
Jude Neale
Marnie Eldridge

Katie Vautour
Elizabeth Armerding

Ada Maria Soto
Susie Taylor
Nicola Aime
Ruth Daniell

Magpie Deadline Extended!

As the entries for the Magpie Award have been pouring in today, we at Pulp HQ have realized we will not be able to get them processed over the weekend.  So since we’re giving ourselves and extended deadline, we thought we’d give you one too:

New deadline: 11:59pm Sunday April 17th.

That means you have until midnight on Sunday to push your fledglings out of the next and send them our way.  Entry Guidelines here.

Good luck to all the entrants!

Magpies take flight!

Poets, this is your chance to earn solid money, and what a pleasure it is for our magazine to be able to offer this opportunity to you again this year. The Magpie Award for Poetry gives $600 in rewards to the writers who can capture our judge’s eye, ear, and heart.  We are pleased to announce that last year’s Magpie winner, Diane Tucker, will be the final judge for this year’s contest.  Early bird entries begin March 1st at the discounted rate of $20 for the first poem, and all entrants receive a digital 1-year subscription to Pulp Literature. To get the poetic juices flowing, we are giving you a taste from Diane’s storehouse …

apricot

little peach, little ball of pale
sunset, soft palmful of summer

when you’ve ripened
and I cut you open
you pull away from your stone
easily; you disgorge your heart
you’ve learned
how to let the centre go

and when we really apply the heat
to you, you let yourself dry, become
leather; this sharpens all your flavours
and fills you especially full of iron

so you are for the blood
and the tongue, all this
after you’ve fed the eyes
and the nose
and the hand’s dry palm
with your mole-soft skin

The 2015 Magpie Award for Poetry

The results are in, and here is the report from the final judge, George McWhirter!

The finalists for 2015 were all masterfully precise and evocative at the same time, making a choice of top three not so easy. Finally, I opted for the following:

  1. ‘Caffe Pettirosso’ by Diane Tucker

I think the poem and poet speak for generations of café and restaurant goers whose main item on the menu is their sitting down to appear cool in a cool place, only to have, as on this visit, the afternoon light, the city’s flora and fauna outshine any of the bright lights and personae in the eating and drinking place. This other side of being part of the scene has just been waiting for this poem to happen—with its afternoon scenario, brilliant put-down and simultaneous illumination.

  1. ‘Water in the Way’ by Ace Baker

The drama in the poem of a trip (literal and metaphorical) into death and the consecration of the beloved dead-one’s remains, with the fish-shaped skull, to the deeps of mystery and the waters is spectacular. The moment of that fish arising out of those waters into indelible memory for the granddaughter and the poet solders emblem and epiphany to mine and makes a perfect consummation for the poem.

  1. ‘Wild Berry Suite’ by Jude Neale

This is an elegant and heartfelt elegy with resonant recollections and touching details, very human, very ordinary, but of that small order of the magically ordinary like the berries in the poem that once picked and basketed can be relished over and over with the wild bitter sweet mix of sadness and joy. The poem also mulls the rural and urban into a very special liquidity, the City of Vancouver and the countryside with the fluidity of the river that runs through both and which becomes the sound of Mary Greener Thompson to whose memory the poem is dedicated and that very easy to hear and listen to voice of the poet.

Congratulations to our three finalists, as well as to the rest of the entrants who gave them a hard run for their money.  Our first-place winner will receive $500 and the runners up each receive $50.  The three winning poems will be published in the Autumn 2015 issue of Pulp Literature.

We are thrilled to let you know that all three finalists are local and will be able to attend our awards presentation and reading on Monday May 25th, along with some of the other short-listed poets and both of our judges, Daniel Cowper and George McWhirter.

The Magpie Award for Poetry
magicforestmagpies3Poetry Reading and Award Presentation
Monday 25 May 2015, 6:30pm till ???
The Wolf & Hound, 3617 W Broadway, Vancouver

Please join us as we congratulate the winners with an evening of poetry and celebration!

The Magpie Shortlist

We are extremely pleased to announce the shortlisted poems for the 2015 Magpie Awards.  In alphabetical order by poem title the finalists are:

  • ‘Caffe Pettirosso’ by Diane Tucker
  • ‘Eighty-five green candles’ by Jude Neale
  • ‘Her tongue depressed’ by Sonia Jind
  • ‘Nana’s Hat’ by Jude Neale
  • ‘Northland’ by Ada Maria Soto
  • ‘The heart is a willow tree’ by Ev Bishop
  • ‘The Meadow Spittlebug’ by Monica Diaz
  • ‘Tool Shed’ by Matthew Walsh
  • ‘Water in the Way’ by Ace Baker
  • ‘Wild Berry Suite’ by Jude Neale

According to George McWhirter “The finalists for 2015 were all masterfully precise and evocative at the same time.”

Contest judges George McWhirter and Daniel Cowper will be presenting the awards to the winner and two runners-up on Monday May 25th at the Wolf & Hound pub in Kitsilano.  All the finalists who are local have been invited to attend and read their poems, and we hope you will join us too!

The Magpie Award for Poetry
Monday 25 May 2015, 6:30pm till ???
The Wolf & Hound, 3617 W Broadway, Vancouver

 

George McWhirter, Judge of the Second Annual Magpie Award for Poetry

george mcWe are thrilled that George McWhirter, Vancouver’s first Poet Laureate, has agreed to judge Pulp Literature’s Magpie Award for Poetry for a second time.

Last year’s finalists received not only his approbation, but in-depth and often extensive comments from a leader in the world of Canadian Literature.

We are most grateful and honoured to BC’s much-honoured poet, novelist, editor, and translator for saying yes to year 2 of the contest.

The closing date for entries to the Magpie Award for Poetry is April 15.


Here you will find an excerpt of George McWhirter’s  superb translation of “Solar Poems” by Homero Aridjis, at blogcitylights.

And here you will find a copy of his stunning poem “My Mother’s Red Shawl” on Alex Waterhouse Hayward’s blog.

 

Magpies on Cherry Trees

magpiesmallerIt’s the season for spring flowers in Vancouver, and the birds outside our window are singing their poetry to the beat of the wind in the trees.  (Our apologies to the rest of Canada.)   At Pulp Literature, it’s the season again for poets to submit their best works to our Magpie Award for Poetry, with final recognition given by Vancouver’s first poet laureate, George McWhirter.  Last year’s entries were inspiring, and the winner received $500 in addition to publication. Our contest is open until April 15th, and we challenge you — no, we double dare you — to make us cry, laugh, or revel in the awful beauty of this temporary condition called life.

Earlybird entry fees are in effect till March 15th.  Submission guidelines here.