Tag Archives: Hummingbird Prize

2018 Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize Shortlist

Ten days and ten entries remain. We are pleased to release the Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize shortlist. Listed below are the authors whose stories will be considered, by flash-master Bob Thurber, in alphabetical order.

Amy Neufeld
Jen Knox
Kate Felix
Kate Felix
Liz Cox 
Liza Potvin  
Nicholas Christian  
Rob Taylor   
Robert Runté
Ron. Lavalette   

The list is shorter, and the stakes are higher. Best of luck to these ten flashes of fiction!

 

2018 Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize Longlist

A hummingbird sighting always feels a little bit magical, and with the many entries for this year’s Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize, we are feeling awe-struck! We’re pleased to announce the longlist:  the top 27 entries listed alphabetically by author last name. Authors listed twice have two entries in the longlist.

Alex Reece Abbott
Ariel Basom
Lauren Bentley
Nicholas Christian
Liz Cox
Kate Felix
Kate Felix
Marissa Fischer

Aleisha Hendry
Terrence Huntington
Jen Knox
Jen Knox
Ron. Lavalette
Kim Martins
Jenn Marx
William P. Masters
Gabriella Morrison
Sadi Muktadir

Amy Neufeld
Liza Potvin
Robert Runté
Megan Rodgers
Rob Taylor
Annis Teller
Annis Teller
Hannah van Didden
KT Wagner

Thank you to everyone who entered! The shortlist will be revealed in July, and the winners, picked by Bob Thurber, will be announced July 15th.

Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize Closes June 15th!

One week left to enter the Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize, so polish up your flashiest flash fiction for submission!

Looking for inspiration? Peruse these snippets from past Hummingbird Contest winners. All that furious fluttering should get the juices flowing.

2017 Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize Winner, Issue 17
‘Just Down the Hall’
by Jeanette Topar

Truth was, Mrs Cole had become a little afraid of 902.
Late in the evenings she’d hear 902’s footsteps slide across the tiled hallway, hesitating
outside her door. “Is this my place?” her neighbour would ask. Mrs Cole would mute the
volume on her TV and hold her breath as she sat quietly in her tidy living room waiting for the woman to shuffle away. The last few times Mrs Cole had encountered her, 902 was wearing nothing but a gray slip that blended with the colour of her skin and matched her hair — she appeared little more substantial than a shadow or dust mote hovering in the hall.

2016 Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize Winner, Issue 13
‘Xuefei and his heart’
by Rebecca Wurz

Xuefei sat on a metal stool in the corner of the operating theatre. He’d been awake all night, and now, sitting in the quiet of the deserted room, he felt drowsy. He had transported the heart of the criminal executed at dawn from the prison infirmary to the university hospital’s surgical suite, built especially for this demonstration. American transplant surgeons, collaborating with Chinese colleagues, were scheduled to do the first heart transplant on Chinese soil.

2015 Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize Winner, Issue 9
‘The Last Neanderthals’
by Christina Crocker Escribano

You say, No one is going to eat us, but I know better. The path of the forest is necklaced in footprints. The surface of the snow is scuffed and bloodied. They left no remains of skin or bone, just a fistful of hair that looks like our own. We stop and watch, for a long time, as if the blood was an outline, a shadow, a spirit blooming in the ice. You say the soul lifts from the body, but I see that it doesn’t.

2014 Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize Winner, Issue 5
Here I Lay Down My Heart
by Rob Taylor

Hayim lifted Mima toward the dhow.  The captain knelt, grabbed her by her armpits and lifted her up, then lowered her into the hull.  Hayim tossed in his duffle bag and for a moment, in the thin skim of ocean and sand that skirts Bagamoyo, stood apart from all that mattered in his world.  Then he hoisted himself on board. Mima was already playing with the livestock and making friends with the other children. In the weeks since their arrival in Tanzania she had learned a mouthful of Swahili and was now in full song.  Samaki! Kuku! Mbuzi! she pointed and guessed, and the children laughed and nodded and were impressed.  Hayim climbed atop a mound of rice bags, maybe seven or eight deep, and pressed his duffle bag into the curve of the hull, punching it here and there with his fists, pounding out their shape.  Between punches images of Tel Aviv flashed in his mind — their old apartment, the table and chairs, dishes and books he’d filled it with. Those few weeks when Mima had gone to preschool and life had felt normal and the word normal had plumped with meaning.  Then Hayim lay down and his mind cleared.

The 2018 Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize close June 15th. We hope to see your submission soon!

Read Hummingbird Contest winners and runners-up of years past in Issue 5, Issue 9, Issue 13, and Issue 17.
 Issue 5,  Winter 2015
 Issue 9, Winter 2016
 Issue 13, Winter 2017
 Issue 17, Winter 2018

 

2018 Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize

Close your eyes and it might pass you by! The Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize is now open and we’ve got our noses pressed up against the glass, eager to see colourful flashes of fiction whizzing by!

Contest open: 1 May 2018
Deadline: 15 June 2018
Winners notified: 15 July 2018
Winners published in: Pulp Literature Issue 23, Winter 2019
First Prize: $300 and a 1 year subscription to Duotropehummingbird5
Runner up: $75

Judge: Bob Thurber

Entry fee: $15
Editorial Critique: $15
Early Bird fee (before 15 May): $10
Entry fees include a 1-year digital subscription to Pulp Literature.

This contest is for previously unpublished short fiction up to 1000 words in length.  Multiple entries welcome.  Total entries limited to 300.

Want feedback on your story?  Get a professional critique from one of the Pulp Literature editors for only $15 more.

The Winner, The Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize

We are happy to announce the winner of the Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize!

The winning story is ‘Just Down the Hall’ by Jeanette Topar.

Our final judge, Bob Thurber, enjoyed reading all of the finalists several times before deciding that ‘Just Down the Hall‘  “had qualities that glowed in the dark atmosphere and sense of dread the story presents. Nicely done.”

Congratulations to our winner!

Here’s a taste of  Jeanette Topar’s winning story.

Truth was, Mrs. Cole had become a little afraid of 902. Late in the evenings she’d hear 902’s footsteps slide across the tiled hallway, hesitating outside her door. “Is this my place?” her neighbour would ask.  Mrs. Cole would mute the volume on her TV and hold her breath as she sat quietly in her tidy living room waiting for the woman to shuffle away.  The last few times Mrs. Cole had encountered her, 902 was wearing nothing but a gray slip that blended with the color of her skin and matched her hair…

Jeanette Topar receives $300 and publication of her haunting tale in Pulp Literature Issue 17, Winter 2018.

The Editor’s Choice

For the Editor’s Choice, we had to think very hard before selecting from the titles in the Hummingbird Prize long list.  But we were united at last in selecting the moving story ‘The Bruised Peach’ by William Kaufmann.  This story will also appear in Issue 17 of Pulp Literature, Winter 2018.

Congratulations to our winners.  And a big thanks to our fine entrants.  Our deep appreciation goes to final judge Bob Thurber and his keen judgement of flash fiction. Bob Thurber is known throughout the flash fiction universe for his intense, no-holds-barred storytelling, and is the author of Nickel Fictions: 50 Exceedingly Brief Stories, Paperboy: A Dysfunctional Novel, and Nothing But Trouble.

Our next contest, The Raven Short Story Contest, opens September 1st.  Stay on top of all our contests by subscribing to our free newsletter.

Hummingbird Prize Shortlist

After much deliberation, the editors are pleased to announce the shortlist for the 2017 Hummingbird Prize. In alphabetical order by story, the shortlist is as follows:

  • “A Pop of Purple” by Sarah Chamberlain
  • “All Day Every Day” by CE Mandybura
  • “Bequest” by Soramimi Hanarejima
  • “Choosing Guns” by Linda Kirkby
  • “Coasting” by Melanie Cossey
  • “Commonplace Permit” by Ella Christie
  • “Just Down the Hall” by Jeanette Topar
  • “Late Blight” by KT Wagner
  • “Pilgrimage” by Alex Reece Abbott
  • “The Bruised Peach” by William Kaufmann
  • “The Cure” by Salvatore Difalco

Congratulations to all the authors!  The winner as chosen by Bob Thurber will be announced on July 15th.

The Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize is open!  But catch that earlybird now — entry fees go up on May 15th.  Guidelines are here.

The Brilliant Hummingbirds

We are delighted to announce the winners of the 2016 Hummingbird Prize for Flash Fiction, as chosen by the master of flash himself, Bob Thurber.  Here is what Bob has to say about the finalists:

hummingbirdissue7Nice job, all of you. A superior batch of finalists. I enjoyed so many of them.  Here are my final selections

Winner:
‘Xuefei and his Heart’ by Rebecca Wurtz
for its solid writing and wonderfully intriguing surreality

First Runner-up:
‘Painted Nails’ by Jenna Park
for its painful voice and understatement

Second Runner-up:
‘Scathed’ by Holly Woodward
for its wild energy and insistence

As always with these contests the senior editors indulge themselves by honouring an additional story that caught their eyes.  This year the Editor’s Pick is ‘Better Watch Out’ by Anna Belkine.

The winner and first runner-up will be published in Pulp Literature Issue 13, Winter 2017, and we hope to find space for the second runner-up and Editor’s Pick in that or future issues.

Thanks once more to Bob Thurber for taking on the judging, and congratulations to these brilliant writers!

Jen, Mel & Sue
Pulp Literature Press

 

 

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The Hummingbird 2016 Shortlist

We’re pleased to announce the finalists of the 2016 Hummingbird Prize for Flash Fiction!

  • ‘Saturday in the Penthouse’ by Liana Jahan Imam
  • ‘Xuefei and his heart’  by   Rebecca Wurtz
  • ‘Funerals’ by Jamie Grove
  • ‘Refugee Circus’ by Stephen Frech
  • ‘Painted Nails’ by  Jenna Park
  • ‘Neighborhood Watch’ by Yasmina Madden
  • ‘In My Drawer’ by Patricia Berry
  • ‘Now You See It’  by Nancy Ludmerer
  • ‘Waiting’  by Jesse Sensibar
  • ‘Scathed’ by Holly Woodward
  • ‘In the Valley of the Sun’ by Gleah Powers
  • ‘Fall on Your Knees’ by Nancy Ludmerer
  • ‘Whale in the Park’ by Stephanie Vernier
  • ‘Chameleons’ by Curtis VanDonkelaar
  • ‘Better Watch Out’  by Anna Belkine
  • ‘Them Bones, Them Bones’ by Colin Thornton
  • ‘Wedding of the Junk Dealer’s Daughter’ by Jesse Sensibar

We tried to keep the list to 15, but these stories were all so good it would be too hard to leave any one of them off the shortlist.  Congratulations to these fine authors, and stay tuned for the announcement of the winner on Friday!

 

The Hummingbird Longlist

Thank you to all the wonderful storytellers who submitted to this years’ Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize.  Every year the number of quality stories grows, making our jobs as first judges ever more difficult.  This year we brought in a fourth prelimary judge, Katherine Howard, who helped us narrow our longlist down to 30 excellent pieces.  In no particular order the top thirty are:

  • Saturday in the Penthousehummingbirdissue7
  • Xuefei and his heart
  • Harmless
  • Silk
  • Arabesque
  • Golden Snowflake
  • Painted Nails
  • Neighborhood Watch
  • Funerals
  • Looking East from Heckethorn
  • My Brother’s Therapist
  • Texture of the Sea
  • In My Drawer
  • Scathed
  • Refugee Circus
  • Now You See It
  • Animal Eyes
  • Still Your Mother’s House
  • In the Valley of the Sun
  • Fall on Your Knees
  • Better Watch Out
  • Chameleons
  • Hell in Paradise
  • Whale in the Park
  • Them Bones, Them Bones
  • Ford
  • Button
  • The Deathbed
  • Venetian Blind
  • Ascending
  • A Mailman Drinking a Milkshake
  • Early Harvest
  • Waiting
  • The Yellow Blanket
  • The Wedding of the Junk Dealer’s Daughter

Congratulations to these authors who will remain anonymous until our final judge, Bob Thurber, has finished his deliberations, and to all the writers who submitted stories that made our job so difficult, yet enjoyable.

Stay tuned — we will be publishing the shortlist and the winners on July 15th!

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