Tag Archives: Anna Belkine

2019 Year of Authors: 21 – 25 Jan

As we continue our Year of Authors, celebrating the amazing artists and authors from the first twenty issues of Pulp Literature, we enter a week of four Angelas and an Anna!

21st – 25th January 2019

Monday: Angela Caravan, Issue 20

Angela Caravan writes poetry and fiction. She lives in Vancouver, BC, with a boy and a man and sometimes has trouble telling the difference between the two.  You can find some of her recent writing in Longleaf Review and Reel Honey Mag.

Tuesday: Angela Melick, Issue 1

Angela, aka ‘Jam’ is an engineer who draws comics at night.  She lives in Vancouver BC with Trevor, who is a fish. She has no cats … yet.  She likes skiing and cycling, coffee and pancakes, manga and physics.  She hates squirrels and puddles, mean people and loud noises.  She chronicles her life in webcomic version at wastedtalent.ca.  “The Mechanics” orginally appeared in Exploded View (Cloudscape Comics, 2010).

Wednesday: Angela Post, Issue 15

‘Sourdough’ was the runner-up in the 2016 Surrey International Writers’ Conference Storyteller’s Award, judged by Jack Whyte and Diana Gabaldon.  Angela Post was born in the Yukon and grew up with her Brazilian mother and Latvian father in a mining town inhabited by about 500 people. She writes young adult and children’s books when not working as a psychologist.  During her lunch-time walks around SFU, the character of the mountain-dwelling prospector, or ‘sourdough’, began dogging her steps until she wrote about him. You can follow Angela on twitter @angspost.

Thursday: Angela Rebrec, Issue 18

Angela Rebrec is a writer, singer, graphic artist, and mother who works as a longshoreman to help fund her many passions.  Her writing has appeared most recently in Prairie Fire, Grain, The Antigonish Review, and PRISM International’s Creative Nonfiction Contest.  She is the managing editor of pulp mag, Kwantlen Polytechnic University’s magazine of literature and fine art, and facilitates writing workshops with elementary-aged children as well.  Angela lives with her husband and three children in Delta on unceded Coast Salish lands. Her poem ‘On a Dark Lake’s Edge’ was shortlisted for the 2017 Magpie Award for Poetry.

Friday: Anna Belkine, Issues 6 & 13

Anna Belkine is a data analyst, living in California. She writes during those powerful moments of creative inspiration that occur when both of her kids are asleep at the same time. Her  flash fiction story, ‘The Ravens’ came out in Pulp Literature Issue 6, Spring 2015, and ‘You Better Watch Out’ was a Christmas Horror piece appearing in Issue 13, Winter 2017.

‘Better Watch Out’ by Anna Belkine

By now our subscribers should have received their digital copies of Issue 13, and many of the print versions have arrived at their destinations as well.  In the errata department we issue our profuse apologies to author Anna Belkine, whose name was inadvertently left out of the table of contents.  Fortunately, her creepy Christmas story, ‘Better Watch Out’ was not left out, and for those you who haven’t yet had a chance to read it, here’s a sneak preview …

 

Better Watch Out

by Anna Belkine

Sally and I were terrified of Santa as children.  No, not those impostors who hung around shopping malls.  The real Santa lived in our air conditioning vent.  You could hear him moving in there, every once in awhile — a sort of wet rustle.  We knew our parents could hear it too, but they tried very hard to be dismissive about it.  This was just the sound old vents made in the winter, they said.  Santa was just a myth, they said.  But the terror in their eyes told me he was real.  They knew he was real.  That he was there.  And they were lying.

He came out only when we slept.  Somehow he could always tell if we were just pretending.  Like in the song.  You would hear him come out just as you felt your body go limp, just as your consciousness slipped heavily out of your belly and you were no longer able to command your eyes to open.  You could feel him, moving around the room, the large round mass of him, dressed in the sort of shimmering red hues that creep behind your eyelids on bright days.  And he talked, a lot, all the time, using mangled sounds neither pronounceable nor reproducible.  All we understood at first was that his name was Santa.  The way he said it, it sounded like a heavy scuffling, followed by the noise of something viscous dripping heavily on a linoleum floor.  Sssss— tah.  Tah.  Tah.

We had no choice but to listen to him scuffling and hovering and looming there in the dark, behind our closed eyelids.  He never threatened.  He was just waiting.  For the opportunity to be mean.  And we were waiting too, immobilized by sleep, like insects under a pane of glass.

Some nights, we could make some excuse not to sleep in our beds.  Some nights we managed to stay awake until morning.  But in the end, we were still made to lie in the dark by ourselves, with him behind the vent.  Rustling.  Eventually we understood that it was important to our parents that we do that.  They let him visit us.  That must have been the deal they made with him.  Sally and I were on our own.

Especially Sally.  See, I was the favourite child.  Our parents made a token effort to conceal it, but it wasn’t enough; we both knew it, we both felt it.  She was in their way.  An embarrassment.  It’s not like they actively wished her gone, no — but it was clear they would have been relieved if she were.  Just as I could feel the evil skulking around in our room, I could feel her loneliness and her rejection clinging to me, a skinny bundle of ribs, knees, and gasps.  Without me, she had nobody.

… find out what happens to Sally and her sibling in Pulp Literature Issue 13, Winter 2017.

And the Raven Contest Winner Is…

Pesky Summer Jobs by Tais Teng
Pesky Summer Jobs by Tais Teng

Our third contest was a tough one: write a story to go with the intriguing and detailed cover painting, ‘Pesky Summer Jobs’ by Dutch artist Taïs Teng.  Some of the stories submitted merely touched peripherally on the theme of ravens or the ancient artifacts, while others made full use of the visual images, but all of the finalists had something, whether in the theme, the writing, or cleverness of the plot, that caught our eye.

We congratulate once more our finalists:

  • ‘The Hemisphere Stone’ by Mike Glyde
  • ‘Dear Louis’ by Sara Cedeno
  • ‘Claws In’ by Ace Baker
  • ‘Odd Jobs’ by KL Mabbs
  • ‘Family Relics’ by Katherine Wagner
  • ‘The Ravens’ by Anna Belkine
  • ‘The Inner Light’  by Krista Wallace
  • ‘The Jealous Valley’ by Kiril Lavarevski

From this list the editors would like to make special mention of ‘Odd Jobs’ by KL Mabbs, which was a witty encounter with Babylonian mythology, and ‘Family Relics’ by Katherine Wagner, which managed to encorporate almost all the elements of the painting in an excellent story.

The winner and runner up were both so good that we have decided we will publish both stories in Issue 6, with the runner up receiving our regular per word rate.  We would love to be able to award first prize to both of these, but a favourite must be chosen.  The Runner up in the 2014 Raven Cover Story Contest is

  • ‘The Ravens’ by Anna Belkine.

And the winner is …

  • ‘The Inner Light’ by Krista Wallace!

Actor, author and swordsman CC Humphreys took time out of his busy speaking and writing schedule to choose our winner, and he had this to say:

“The subtlety of Inner Light won me over.  I loved the total immersion in a clearly realized world.  Of course I am an actor and I get the references.  But the story works on many levels other than the theatrical. The writing is clear, precise from the beginning. The unease is there, but subtly, making me want to read on. In such a short piece, the several characters are distinct.  Matilda is nicely nuanced, the arrogance of an award winning director, the fear of someone dealing with forces beyond control.  There’s a distinct sense that the characters will go on – except perhaps for one who won’t!  Sacrifices must be made for art. For success.  As Macbeth discovers. Bravo!”

Our congratulations to Krista Wallace for writing the winning story — and even more for garnering such praise from the brilliant CC Humphreys!

Krista Wallace will be the featured author for Issue 6 of Pulp Literature.  Along with publication and her name in large font on the cover she will receive a prize of $500.00. We are so pleased!

Congratulations and thanks to everyone who took the time to write such wonderful stories for our contest.

From Jen, Sue and Mel