An Editor Dishes on Story Submissions

We’ll soon be reading manuscripts for acquisition again at Pulp Literature Press. What strikes me first is the talent that comes through our e-portals.  Space is an issue, and we wish we could take more stories, if only our magazine had a thousand pages.  As well, we’ll often reject a story because we’ve published our quota of, for example, zombie tales.  Or … we’re looking for more zombie tales.

Other than fit, what do I look for in stories for our quarterly, and in novels for our press?

Here are three great reasons I read on.

These may be worth identifying as a time-saving effort for any submission.

  1. The author nails time, place, tone, promise of genre, and a hint at the central conflict on page one, often paragraph one, and continues to do so with the start of each new scene.
  2. It’s clear that the writer has dug deep for ideas for turning points, that are possibly archetypical, but not clichéd, within the genre.
  3. I can tell a fellow editor what this story is about in a sentence and we’ll both still want to know what happens. It’s about a guy who’s ambushed and sent into 30 years of cryogenic sleep, and has to return to his own past to get even and create a better future, second time around. (The Door Into Summer, Robert Heinlein.)

When it comes down to it, as an acquisitions editor, I’m also an avid reader.  I hope to be a big fan of your work.

I hope you’ll have another brilliant writing week.  Cheers, Mel


If you’re a fan of Mel Anastasiou’s writing tips, you might enjoy her pocket-sized writing guide The Writer’s Boon Companion: Thirty Days Towards an Extraordinary Volume. Motivates, organizes, encourages, inspires you through 30 days of hints and help with narrative structure.

From Pulp Literature Press

 

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