Category Archives: News

Spring Fever Back Issue Sale!

Spring is here and the daffodils and cherry blossoms are busting out at last!  To celebrate we have pruned the prices on all our spring back issues in print format.  That includes Issue featuring JJ Lee, Issue 6 featuring Krista Wallace, Issue 10 featuring Carol Berg, and Issue 14 featuring CC Humphreys.  But hurry, this special ends March 31st!

Planes, trains, and automobiles transport us with tales from CC Humphreys, Colin Thornton, plus Joseph Stilwell and Hugh Henderson, as well as poetry from David Clink and Ian Haight. There are bears, boars, and kind-eyed villains from Greg Brown, William Charles Brock, JM Landels, and Susan Pieters, while the reaper himself makes a visit in Mel Anastasiou’s next Stella novella.  All that plus the winners of both the Raven and SiWC contests.  Jump on board … the journey’s just beginning!
Pulp Literature Issue 14, Spring 2017 $14.99  now $9.99

 

Issue 10 small

Magical murder mystery by Carol Berg; monster hunting with Gregg Chamberlain; sleuthing with Stella and Mel Anastasiou; comic by Kris Sayer; poetry by Matthew Walsh, Ev Bishop, and Ada Maria Soto; flash fiction by Andrea Lewis and Stephen Case; short stories by Sarina Bosco and Susan Pieters; Allaigna’s Song by JM Landels; and literary fiction from the 2015 Raven winners Emily Linstrom and PE Bolivar.
Pulp Literature Issue 10, Spring 2016 $14.99  now $9.99

 

 

Genre-defying fiction by  Krista Wallace, Bob Thurber, Laura Kostur, Theric Jepson, FJ Bergmann, Tobi Cogswell and more!
Pulp Literature Issue 6, Spring 2015 $14.99  now $9.99

 

 

 

 

Our second issue of good books for the price of a beer, featuring fiction and artwork by JJ Lee, Sarah Pinsker, Trevor Shikaze, Milo James Fowler, AY Dorsey,  and more!
Pulp Literature Issue 2, Spring 2014 $14.99  now $9.99

 

 

 

 

And if that’s not enough Spring for you, you can also pick up Pulp Literature Issue 18, Spring 2018, hot off the presses right now!

Here’s the Buzz: The 2018 Bumblebee Shortlist

Are we getting excited yet?  The winner of the 2018 Bumblebee Shortlist will be announced at our Spring Launch party this Friday at the Cottage Bistro.   In the meantime we’re delighted to announce the shortlisted stories.

The 2018 Bumblebee Flash Fiction Contest Shortlist

‘Alphabet Soup’ by Alex Reece Abbott

‘Breaking the Ice’ by Natalie Persoglio

‘Cinnamon Grace’ by Jude Neale

‘Crow Funeral’ by Alex Reece Abbott

‘Far from the Madding Crowd’ by K W George

‘Gross Motor’ by Sara Mang

‘Inciting Insight’ by Soramimi Hanarejima

‘Lullaby, Valentine, Paper Crane’ by R S Wynn

‘Special People’ by Alex Reece Abbott

‘Third Date’ by Nicole Vuong

Familiar Names

Congratulations to all these amazing authors.  The stories are judged blind, so we have no idea who the authors are until after the shortlist has been selected.  That said there are some familiar names that have come up.

Triple congratulations to Alex Reece Abbott who managed to catch our eye with three of her stories!  Regardless of the results of this contest, Alex’s piece ‘My Brother Paulie: A Domestic Space Oddyssey’ was an honourable mention for the 2017 Raven Short Story Contest and will be published in Pulp Literature Issue 19, coming out this summer.

Poet Jude Neale has been shortlisted for the Magpie Award for Poetry more than once, and her poem ‘About Light’ was published in Pulp Literature Issue 13, Winter 2017.  We’re delighted to see her short fiction also make the cut.

Soramimi Hanarejima has also been shortlisted for several our contests and his whimsical short story ‘The Theft of Confidence’ can be found in Pulp Literature Issue 17, Winter 2018.  You can pick up this and other back issues at our Friday launch.

We hope you’ll join us this Friday for the public announcement judge Bob Thurber’s pick for best flash fiction!

Pulp Literature Spring Launch

Friday 16 March, 6 – 8pm
The Cottage Bistro, 4468 Main Street, Vancouver
FREE, but please RSVP on Eventbrite

 

Pre-order your copy of Issue 18 and save $2.
If you are picking your copy up in person, use the code LAUNCH to avoid shipping charges.

 

 

 

 

Featured Author: Genni Gunn

If you look closely, hints of spring are all around us, from barely there tree buds, to coat shedding temperatures. But no sign is clearer than the launch of our Spring 2018 issue! To celebrate Pulp Literature Issue 18, Spring 2018, Pulp is hosting a launch at Cottage Bistro, complete with readings from local Pulp Literature authors, like Issue 18 featured author, Genni Gunn.

Genni Gunn’s eight books include novels, short fiction, poetry, and memoir. She has also written the libretto for the opera Alternate Visions, produced in Montreal in 2007, and has translated three collections of poetry from Italian. Her novel Tracing Iris was made into a film, and her novel Solitaria was longlisted for the  2011 Giller Prize. She lives in Vancouver and can be found at gennigunn.com.

Genni Gunn, is our featured author in Issue 18 with her short story, ‘Stones’.  Be the first to read an exclusive interview with Genni, as well as other hand-picked short stories, poems, a comic, and the winners of Pulp Literature’s 2017 Raven Short Story Contest when you get a hot-off-the-press copy at our Spring Launch.

Pulp Literature Spring 2018 Launch
Friday 16th March, 6-8pm
The Cottage Bistro, 4468 Main St, Vancouver
Free to attend, but please RSVP

RSVP here

Until March 15th you can save $2 on pre-orders of Issue 17 print or ebook versions.  Reserve your copy now!

 

Featured Author: AJ Odasso

Part of Pulp Literature‘s mission is to showcase work that challenges us and delights us by new and established writers from diverse and underrepresented backgrounds. Pulp Literature author AJ Odasso weaves words as an established queer-identifying poet who occasionally dabbles in well-crafted short-narratives.

Odasso is the author of three award-nominated poetry collections (Lost Books and The Dishonesty of Dreams, from Flipped-Eye Publishing; Things Being What They Are, unpublished and shortlisted for the Sexton Prize) as well as a handful of short stories.  She serves as Senior Poetry Editor at Strange Horizons magazine.  You can find her at twitter.com/ajodasso.

AJ left us hanging with Part 1 of ‘We Come Back Different’ in Issue 17, and while we’re patiently waiting for Part 2 in Pulp Literture Issue 18, here’s a refresher:

 

We Come Back Different
AJ Odasso

3 June 18—
St George’s, Bermuda


My dearest Tess,

In spite of the disagreeable circumstances under which we last parted, I hope that this letter finds you well.  It will cheer you to know that your father’s health is much improved since you left for Scotland this spring.  He delights in your single-minded love of study, and  his desire is that you should make as fine a scholar as your mother.  But I must caution you, my love, to remember that there are pleasures in this world that do not concern anatomy, chemistry, or engineering.  My ever-troublesome charge — Trevor is growing! — has found an expedient use for your old laboratory goggles.  Your brother has taken to packing them for our jaunts to Horseshoe Bay.  He has mastered the art of holding his breath underwater, during which time he is content, from behind glass through which you once squinted at dissections, to observe parrot fish the size of soup tureens.

Regarding our falling-out, I am not inclined to continue in such unseemly avoidance — for you have said that what you admire most is my forthrightness, and I hope I have not been foolish in treasuring your honesty.  Do not take your wealth for granted:  had my mother been rich, she would have wished for me an education as fine as yours.  I understand that the completion of your degree is essential; I want nothing more than for you to perfect your skill in the sciences.  All I ask in return is that you do not write off my fancies, for poetry and politics are equal to the task of improving humankind.  Furthermore, I remain steadfast in my opinion that you have done poorly by Trevor.  His musical talent continues to flourish, and although you set little stock by the performance he had so carefully prepared for your departure, he believes firmly that you are the cleverest, kindest creature ever to walk the earth.  Write to him, Tess.  He misses you.

For my part, I pass endless days in pursuit of Trevor and in seeing to your father’s welfare.  Although he is more sanguine than you will remember, his memory declines.  For each time that he recognizes me, he supposes me to be your mother at least twice.  I cannot persist in this sad affair without reassurance of your support — surely you may find the time to write more than once a month, so that my spirits might be lifted!  I can take only so much solace in Trevor’s compositions and in discovering which of your father’s favourite strays has lately hidden her kittens amidst the banana trees and knee-high weeds in the garden.  Artemis has dropped her first litter.

This corner of the world is monotonous, my darling.  Be brilliant, and be well.

Ever yours,
Amelia

* * *

12 June 18—
St Andrews,  Scotland

Sweet Amelia,

This correspondence may reach your shores by sea rather than by air, much to my annoyance.  The pilots’ strike cannot continue indefinitely, so why not apply your political acumen to that when next you submit a column to The Trans-Atlantic Weekly?  Several of the faculty here are ardent followers of your rambling yet sagacious wit.  Perhaps it will earn you a scholarship.

Please do not think that I have not taken to heart the contents of your letter, but I must report a strange occurrence that has lately beset my corner of the world.  Lansdowne, my tutor, has been ardently in favour of my chosen discipline — that is, the repair and replacement of organs and other such vital tissue through methods of hermetically sealed replacements, etc.  I will not attempt another description of these devices’ components, nor of the fusion by which they run in perpetuity.  You, lively and insightful, must populate this world with wonders, whereas I, eternally brooding, must endeavour to unlock the causes of its unhappiest misfortunes and to repair them if I am able.

The occurrence of which I speak centres on one such misfortune, Amelia — the gravest of them all, I fear, to which none of us are immune.  The body of a young woman washed ashore on the West Sands just over a week ago …  

Read the rest of part of ‘We Come Back Different’
right now in Issue 17….

… and save $2 when you pre-order Issue 18 featuring the conclusion of the story, due out in April.

The Bumblebee Flash Fiction Longlist

A swarm of flash fiction stories is still buzzing in our heads, but the preliminary decisions have been made. Presented alphabetically by author first name, we are pleased to present the longlist for the Bumblebee Flash Fiction Contest.

2018 Bumblebee Flash Fiction Contest Longlist

Note: if a name appears twice, that means two stories by the same author have made the list.  Double congratulations!

Alex Reece Abbott
Alex Reece Abbott
Alex Reece Abbott
Allan Dyen-Shapiro
Amy Gavin
Katie Gray
Amy Soscia Paloski
Anneliese Schultz
C.W. Accetta
Catherine Raphael
David Wiseman
Emily Lonie
Jake Teeny
Jake Teeny
Jeanine Manji
Jessica Lampard
Jude Neale

Krista Wallace
Leslie Wibberley
Louise Burch
Lucy Stone
Lucy Stone
Lynne MacLean
Martin Brodsky
Mary Steer
Natalie Persoglio
Patricia Sandberg
Ron Lavalette
Sabella Forde
Tracey White
Victoria Richards

Thank you to everyone who submitted! Stay tuned for the short list.  The final winner will be notified on March 15th, and we will publicly announce Judge Bob Thurber’s choice for most buzz-worthy flash fiction piece at our Spring Launch on March 16th at the Cottage Bistro!

PS: Poets, don’t forget that the Magpie Award is now open for earlybird entries!

 

 

Author News: Kelli Allen and Nicholas Christian

Bon voyage to Pulp Literature poets, Kelli Allen and Nicholas Christian! The pair will be moving to Changchun, China on the 25th of February for a wonderful opportunity as visiting Professor and T.A. at Northeast Normal University.

Kelli and Nick frequently travel the globe looking for and encouraging adventure.  Doubtless this move comes with great excitement (and some trepidation), so to Kelli and Nick: best of luck, and may you embrace the uncertainties before you as a chance to forge deeper connections and inspire creativity!

Kelli Allen is the poet behind ‘You Don’t Know Your Life Anyway’ (Issue 17), which is a response poem to Nicholas Christian’s ‘Wassail in Ink,’ (Issue 15 ).

     

Wanna schmooze? Join our Team

Become our Publicity Pro!

Pulp Literature Press has an opening for a new publicity intern.  Incredibly onerous duties include

  • visiting bookstores
  • attending writing and fan conferences
  • talking about Pulp Literature on social media
  • selling books at vendor tables
  • attending booklaunches

In addition to all this fun stuff there is a bit of work to do, such as writing letters to bookstores and libraries, researching marketing and book placement avenues, soliciting book reviews, and reporting back at weekly online meetings.

The position is unpaid, but in return we offer you

  • print copies of the magazine
  • monthly Hour Stories writing workshops
  • the chance to attend conferences and events for free
  • an inside look at the machinery of a small press
  • a voice in the direction of the press
  • camaraderie, and our undying gratitude.

The ideal candidate will have a love of fiction, enthusiam for the magazine, and live in the Greater Vancouver area.  However, we also need enthusiastic volunteers to spread the word in other parts of the globe, so don’t let your physical location stop you from applying.  Drop us a line at info(at)pulpliterature.com if you think you’d like to jump into this opportunity!

 

 

Congratulations to Robert J Sawyer

Please join us in congratulating Issue 7’s feature author, Robert J Sawyer. As the holder of various distinctions in the sci-fi literary community, including the Nebula Award, the Hugo Award, and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award, Robert is known around the world as the Canadian master of science fiction.

Now, his contributions to Canadian fiction have earned him a place in the Order of Ontario, the province’s highest honour, which recognizes individuals whose exceptional achievements in their field have left a lasting legacy in the province, Canada and beyond.

Robert will be officially appointed on February 27th. Until then, see the writing chops of this award-winning author for yourself in this excerpt from Pulp Literature Issue 7, Summer 2015.

Fallen Angel

by Robert J Sawyer

Angela Renaldo never knew if it was an act of homage or of defiance—whether it was the ultimate show of faith in God, or whether it was tantamount to flipping the bird at the Almighty.

Carlo, the eldest of her five brothers, doubtless had an opinion.From his position, planted firmly on the ground, near the bleachers, hands resting on the gray rubber rims of the twin wheels that propelled him along, there could be no doubt. God had enough to keep Himself busy looking after regular folk; He had no time for those who deliberately tempted fate.

Angela, the youngest Renaldo child, loved Carlo; she didn’t love all her brothers, but her affection for Carlo was pure. He was the only one who had played catch with her, the only one who had listened to her, the only one who never seemed to mind her being around.

Now, of course, things were different. Now, Carlo didn’t play catch with anyone. He just sat in his chair, almost never looking up.

There was nothing to fear, Poppa always said. We’ll be so high up that we’ll catch God’s eye. 

Read the rest of ‘Fallen Angel’ in Pulp Literature Issue 7,
on sale for only 9.99 print / 3.49 ebook till the end of the month!

 

 

 

 

 

Interview with Bob Thurber

With the Bumblebee Contest drawing to a close on February 15th, flash fiction maestro and Bumblebee contest judge, Bob Thurber, sat down to give his thoughts on constructing short fiction,  the importance of flash fiction, and his process in judging entries.

Pulp Lit: Judging flash fiction stories sounds harder than picking a favourite flavour of gelato. How do you manage to sort through to find a winner? What kind of stories do you gravitate towards?

When I’m judging a contest entry I have to read each submission several times. It’s a tad obsessive, but I like to hum the tune, so to speak. A superior entry is a song I can’t get out of my head.

I wrote a lot of fragmented prose during my apprentice years. Most of it was exercise, practice for some principle or model. Twenty minutes to do such and such. Or forty minutes to build a scene. Over time I developed a nose — and an ear — for a paragraph packing a punch, or a tense sense built by a few weighty lines.  (My earliest years were spent reading and rereading stacks of comic books).  I’ve always been drawn to and fascinated by how compressed prose, and even sections of longer stories or novels, shifts mood and emotion by throwing the reader slightly off balance, how a stunning line disturbs or redirects, or a compact phrase elevates a character or propels the story with an inference that is bit stranger than one expects.  Call it the edge.  For me, the sharper that edge the better.

I love the power of a concise prose work that hints at a larger story, one not on the page. This fuller, larger story may be alluded to by the strength and authenticity of the text, by the severity of a rocky voice or unreliably smooth tone, or some other unsettling detail, or some comforting eeriness. Whatever aspect rises up and stands out and overpowers so that I can not help becoming engaged, absorbed, occupied. That’s what I crave as a reader and as an author.

PL:  Our Bumblebee contest is up to 750 words. Do you think the longer stories have a better chance at winning?

I wouldn’t say the longer ones have a better chance, no. Though I will say that, for me, the ‘word limit’ defines the size of the canvas. So I tend to fill up the space allotted.

PL:  The winner of the contest gets $300 CAD and a year’s subscription to Duotrope. Have you used Duotrope and do you recommend it?

I’ve found Duotrope to be a fantastic resource, great for discovering new markets and finding venues receptive to your work. I’ve watched it grow over the years, and I’ve used it many times, and I highly recommend it.

PL:  Why do you think flash fiction is more important than ever for the human race?

Excellent question. And honestly, I don’t have a clue. Brief pieces are certainly more compatible with small screens and busy people. A healthy bite of fiction is always a good thing. But how much and how often one craves another, depends on the reader’s appetite, I would guess.

PL:  Have you ever tried to write poetry? What’s the difference for you between poetry and flash fiction?

I’ve written several hundred poems over the years. I’ve sold a few. I studied a lot of poetry early on. I used to jokingly refer to myself as a Sunday Poet, because I’d regularly draft a few poems in my notebook on Sunday mornings. A dozen or so stories that went on to win a prize or find publication were developed from some of those drafted poems. Case in point: ‘Simple Decoration’, which Pulp Literature republished online recently, started as a short and simple poem. (My wife still has a copy). Over time I kept playing with it, adding lines. And it puffed up to a few hundred words. I still had it broken up into a long poem, then it puffed up some more and saw it was clearly a prose piece. But through all the drafts, the first and last line of ‘Simple Decoration’ never changed.  It was all Jack that Christmas …

PL:  Is there a career to be had in writing short fiction?

As a vocation, yes. As a regular paying occupation, hardly. My first agent, who was a former editor and a remarkably smart and savvy man, told me (rather emphatically) that there wasn’t much demand for short fiction writers. And accordingly, not much fame or fortune. He warned that I’d be hard-pressed to make a name for myself unless I turned my focus to publishing novels. But I’ve never been a good listener.

PL:  Tell us what you’re working on. A new novel? Another short story collection?

I generally shy away from discussing any work in progress, but I currently have two more story collections ready to go. Part of my problem is since my agent passed away I’ve been remiss about reaching out to publishers, and I tend to approach them only one at a time. But I also have two novel manuscripts nearly completed, so I’ll need to get my act together fairly soon.

The Bumblebee contest is closing soon!

Submit your flash fiction before February 15th — all of us are eager to see what precision-made prose you’ve crafted!

Featured Author: Emily Osborne

We love it when we have good news to share about our authors. This week, join us in congratulating Emily Osborne, author of ‘Devonian’ (Pulp Literature Issue 17, Winter 2018) for winning an honorable mention in Contemporary Verse 2’s 2017 Young Buck Poetry Contest!  On top of this good news, we’ve learned that her chapbook Biometrical will be published by Anstruther Press later this year.

Emily Osborne is a researcher, translator, and poet living in British Columbia, Canada.  She earned a PhD in Old Norse-Icelandic literature from the University of Cambridge and recently held a postdoctoral fellowship in mediaeval literature and linguistics at the University of British Columbia.  She has taught mediaeval literature and poetics at Cambridge and UBC and published several scholarly articles.  Her poetry has appeared in The Literary Review of Canada and Symposium, and she was runner-up for Eyewear Publishing’s first Fortnight Prize.  Emily has also published translations of Old English and Old Norse poetry in academic journals and books.

She has kindly shared with us is an excerpt from her poem ‘Diacritics’, published in Minola Review’s 2016-2017 Anthology.

Diacritics

Maybe all vowels were once sister chromatids,
but now we carve grave and caret
on separate word trees.

I can’t read your DNA or lips.
You said my consonants split and replicate,

like cells in tumours.
Writing them makes you stressed.

Possessives are tricky on paper,
so often inked with red. After classes,
ESL students roam cities, see kids
slash ‘ł’ and ‘ø’ on concrete artistry.
Is that Polish? No.
Paint bleeds.
Later they’ll sit at library PCs,
typing home without familiar glyphs.

Viewpoints online metastasize through hashtag
alphabets, while English pushes diacritics
out of foreign correspondence.
Keyboards are capricious,
and we’re étroit d’esprit
when small things make big shifts.

 

Emily’s poem, ‘Glassblowing’, will appear in CV2’s Summer 2018 issue.  In the meantime and you can find ‘Devonian’, and more wonderful poetry in Pulp Literature Issue 17.