Category Archives: News

Short Fiction Submissions Open till December 5th

Calling all writers!  We have a very short submissions opening period on right now!

For this period we are specifically looking for

  • Science Fiction.  We like all forms of spec fic, from alternate history to space opera.  But it’s been a while since we’ve had much good old fashioned hard SF come through the inbox.  Send us your best!
  • Mystery. We’re always well-served with the cozy Stella Rymans and the time-travelling Seven Swans, but we’d also like to see some shorter whodunits. Have you got an intriguing and original mystery that’s 5000 words or under?  Send it in.
  • Stories by Indigenous Canadians.  Since most of us in BC are guests on First Nations’ territories, we’d love to print more stories by the descendants of Canada’s first people.

Submission guidelines, form, and pay rates here

Please note that due to the large number of submissions we receive we can’t reply personally to every submission.  If you submitted in a previous opening period and haven’t heard from us, we are unable to take the story.  If we have contacted you to say its still under consideration, be patient.   Sometimes it takes well over a year to find the right issue for a story we like.

 

There’s still time to enter EVENT Mag’s Spec Writing Contest!

EVENT Magazine presents a smashing new contest for writers who like to experiment:

The “Let Down Your Hair” Speculative Writing Contest

Are you tired of magazines telling you they just don’t print science fiction?  Are you worried your poem has too many goblins to be eligible for such-and-such contest?  Fret no more, because here is a contest where the only limit (other than the 1800 word limit) is your wicked imagination.  Here’s your chance to write work featuring time travel, alchemy, super powers, ghosts, dystopian societies, teleportation, robots with human emotions, humans with robot emotions, talking dogs, talking dolls, mutants, cruel wizards, very old men with enormous wings …

But hurry! The contest deadline is November 20. It’s open to any genre, and the Grand Prize is $1,000, with a $250 Runner-Up (judged by Vancouver’s own Amber Dawn).

Full contest details are here

Raven Short Story Contest Winners 2017

No need to hold your breath any longer:  the results are in!

The Raven Short Story Contest winner for 2017

is Elaine McDivitt with her story, ‘The Tape’.

‘The Tape’ caught judge Brenda Carre in its powerful stream of consciousness .

“Who does not remember the striking cover of The Female Eunuch by Germaine Greer? It provided a visual punch that the story made good on right to the end.  I found the circular theme of tape in Virginia’s haunting narration a gripping read. The unique cadence really supported the sense of horror and realization unlocked at a garage sale.” – Brenda Carre

Coming in as a close runner up, Kerry Craven‘s story, ‘Meggie’.

“This was a very interesting fairy-tale-esque exploration of the dehumanization of Dementia. Through Meggie’s surprising transformation into a new being she is able to move past grief at least for awhile. I loved the Baba Yaga quality of the magical young woman with the sack full of all possibilities. I would love to see the dialect trimmed somewhat. With a bit of editing this has the ‘whiskermarks’ of a fine story.” – Brenda Carre

Both of these stories will appear in Pulp Literature Issue 18, Spring 2018, and the winners take home $300 and $75 respectively as their prizes.

Honorable Mentions go to Alex Reece Abbott for ‘My Brother Paulie: A Domestic Space Odyssey’, and Charity Tahmaseb for ‘The Potato Bug War’.

Congratulations to all of these writers, and special thanks to judge Brenda Carre! Pulp Literature Press is grateful for the abundance of talent and hard work that was poured into all of the submissions for the 2017 Raven Short Story Contest.

Our next contest, the Bumblebee Flash Fiction Contest for stories up to 750 words long, opens January 1st, 2017.  We hope to see you there!

Track your submissions at Duotrope

The 2017 Raven Contest Shortlist

The big announcement for the Raven Short Story Contest is just around the corner! For now, we are excited to announce the incredible authors who have made it on the Raven 2017 shortlist, alphabetically by author first name.

The Raven Short Story Contest Shortlist

Alex Reece Abbott, ‘My Brother Paulie: A Domestic Space Odyssey’

Brian Dang, ‘Edgeless’

C.E. Mandybura, ‘Monkey Days’

Charity Tahmaseb, ‘The Potato Bug War’

Daniel Beaumont, ‘Shifting Bodies’

Dustin He, ‘Carrion Feeder’s Pedigree’

Elaine McDivitt, ‘The Tape’

Jessica Oesterle, ‘Respira’

Joni Hobbs, ‘Lavender Rhy and The Moon Room’

Kerry Craven, ‘Meggie’

Judge Brenda Carre’s chosen winners will be announced tomorrow, November 15th! Until then, we would like to thank everyone for their submissions and we wait alongside you with bated breath …

The Raven Short Story Contest Longlist

Thank you to all you amazing short fiction writers for entering this year’s Raven Short Story Contest. The preliminary judges read this treasure trove of storytelling with great relish and appreciation. We are pleased to announce, alphabetically by author first name, the longlist for the Raven.

The Raven Short Story Contest Longlist

Note: if a name appears twice, that means two stories by the same author have made the list.  Double congratulations!

Alex Reece Abbot
Alex Reece Abbot
Brian Dang
C.E. Mandybura
Caleb Jackson
Carolyn Drake
CE Mandybura
Charity Tahmaseb
Colin Thornton
Daniel Beaumont
Debra Catanzaro
Dustin He
Elaine McDivitt
Elizabeth Barton
Emily Lonie
Hannah van Didden
Heidi L. Waterman
Jackie Carmichael
Jeanine Manji
Jen Bingham
Jessica Oesterle
Joni Hobbs
Joshua Visser
Kathy Joyce
Kerry Craven
KT Wagner
Larry Ivkovich
Liza Potvin
Mark Cameron
Michael Elliott
Peter Dickinson
Richard Arbib
Rob Greene
S. Ondrack
William Kaufmann

Good luck to all these writers, as we go through the difficult job of paring the list down to ten for judge Brenda Carre.  The winners will be announce November 15th.

 

 

Happy NaNoWriMo Eve!

Yes, to some, it’s Hallowe’en, to others its All Saints’ Eve, but for many writers it’s the day before we plunge into a month of furious writing, in an effort to churn out a novel in 30 days.

Can it be done?  It certainly can.  Write 2000 words a day for 30 days and you have 60,000 words — the bones of a good novel.  And you can easily write 2000 words in a couple of hours if you know where you’re going and don’t self-edit along the way (save all that editing for December and January).

So here’s the big secret:  spend 5 minutes at the end of the planning.  Jot down key plot points, twists, character growth, and other elements you want to incorporate in tomorrow’s two thousand words.  That way, when you wake up in the morning, the hard part’s done and you can let the words flow right away.

To get you started, we’ve packaged up the first few pages of our writing journal, The Writer’s Boon Companion: Thirty Days Towards an Extraordinary Volume by Mel Anastasiou.  This excerpt contains a Day 1 prompt: try it out tonight and be ready to hit the road rolling tomorrow morning!

Get your free Day 1 excerpt of The Writer’s Boon Companion

If you found that helpful, why not continue on with the wise guidance of Thaddeus and the  Robot Muse?  Boon Companion is 15% off this month, and as an extra bonus, we’ll send a free pdf to everyone who orders off the website.  Order your copy here.

Hallowe’en Special on Spooky 16

The Autumn issue of Pulp Literature is spectacularly spooky this year.  We have no fewer than two ghosts and one ghost town, three very different end-of-life experiences, ghouls in coffee shops, unidentified monsters in the subway, and a scarily low price of $2.99 on Amazon.com until Hallowe’en!

Pulp Literature Issue 16, Autumn 2017

With authors like kc dyer, Brandon Crilly, Rina Piccolo, Patrick Bollivar, Susan Pieters, Oak Morse, FJ Bergman, Mel Anastasiou, Leah Komar, Greg Brown, JM Landels, and Glenn Pape, this is an issue you don’t want to miss!

Raven Contest Deadline Extended

Due to the fact our managing editor is currently gallivanting around France, Spain and England, fiction and flash fiction authors have a few extra days to send us your stories.

Raven Short Story Contest deadline extended to October 20, 2017

We’re looking forward to reading these entries once Jen is back and recovered from sun, sand, and prosecco …

Read more about the Raven  here… 

The Raven Short Story Contest offers a $300 top prize,  print and e-publication. (Want feedback on your story?  Get a professional critique from one of the Pulp Literature editors for only $25 more.)

The Raven Short Story Contest

Show us your most scintillating treasures in the form of short fiction up to 2500 words in length and you could be the one bringing home $300 to line your nest! Enter the contest here.

Enter the Raven Short Story Contest

Why enter your latest short story in the Raven Short Story Contest?

Enter the Raven

With a top prize of $300, entries limited to 200, and editors eager to read your 250 to 2,000 word tale, you’ve got a great chance of bringing home a Raven prize.  

Flash Fiction geniuses take note!

Enter the Raven

Judge Brenda Carre writes gorgeous fantasy, but she loves the taste of different styles of storytelling and reads avidly across the genres.

More good news: your entry fee of $20  includes a $17.99 value 1-year digital subscription to Pulp Literature, full of more great reads all year long.

Enter the Raven

Mutiple entries welcome. We can’t wait to read them.

Cheers from your Pulp Literature Press Editors

Outlining, a Fractal Approach

Outlining is fractal, like a rocky coastline. The jagged water’s edge looks similar—not identical, just very like—if seen from space, an airplane, a tower, a rooftop, or from a crouching position at the water’s edge. Story sections also look similar at different planning elevations.

Outlining Sections

Whether it’s the 7-volume arc, the single novel, the act, or the scene, it’s the same from varied perspectives. Great stories include the set-up, hard choices and sacrifices, learning and transforming, transfers of power, darkest moments, and great rewards.

Outlining Time Savers

Because sections are similar in structure, we can save  drafting time by carrying outlining templates. These might be graphic organizers we’ve developed ourselves, or various outline styles we’ve learned from experts, or a combination of the two.

Outlining Math

“1,500 to 3,000 words a week drafted to your outline, gives you 70,000 to 140,000 words a year.” – The Writer’s Boon Companion

I hope you’ll have another brilliant week in your writing career.

Cheers, Mel

Note: map detail from Allaigna’s Song: Overture, by JM Landels.  Get this marvellous fantasy read from Pulp Literature Press, here.

You can’t escape magic when it’s in your blood …

When Allaigna was seven she almost sang her baby brother to sleep — forever.  She may not be heir to her mother’s titles and secrets, but she has inherited her grandmother’s dangerous talent for singing music into magic.  As her education proceeds from nursery to weapons ground to the rank of royal page, it becomes increasingly hard to keep her heritage and abilities hidden.

The original map was created by world-builder Scott Fitzgerald Gray and illustrated by Mel Anastasiou.

If you enjoy Mel Anastasiou’s writing tips, you might try her pocket-sized writing guide The Writer’s Boon Companion: Thirty Days Towards an Extraordinary Volume. Motivates, organizes, encourages, inspires.

From Pulp Literature Press