Category Archives: Contests

8 Reasons to enter the SiWC Writing Contest!

Siwc

  1. At $15 (Canadian dollars) it’s about the cheapest contest around, yet has a $1000 prize.
  2. The winner and runner-up are offered publication in Pulp Literature alongside our 2017 feature authors!
  3. Did I mention the $1000 prize? (about $775 USD)
  4. You’ll ensure you write a finished story by the Friday, September 23rd deadline!
  5. The dozen or so shortlisted authors will be read by Diana Gabaldon and Jack Whyte, and that in itself is a reward.
  6. You’ve got good odds.  Despite the high award amount, this isn’t a well-known contest.   As far as I know, they place no paid advertisements and don’t put listings on free sites.  So lucky you for reading this blog post!
  7. Did I mention the $1000 prize?  (No wait, that’s now $800 USD…)
  8. You’ll be joining forces with a spectacular community of writers.  The “Surrey Conference” is known as the friendliest writing conference in North America, for good reason.  We highly recommend it!   (If you’re considering attending, hurry to sign up! They’ve almost sold out!)
    SiWC 2016 Contest Guidelines here!

 

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The Hummingbird 2016 Shortlist

We’re pleased to announce the finalists of the 2016 Hummingbird Prize for Flash Fiction!

  • ‘Saturday in the Penthouse’ by Liana Jahan Imam
  • ‘Xuefei and his heart’  by   Rebecca Wurtz
  • ‘Funerals’ by Jamie Grove
  • ‘Refugee Circus’ by Stephen Frech
  • ‘Painted Nails’ by  Jenna Park
  • ‘Neighborhood Watch’ by Yasmina Madden
  • ‘In My Drawer’ by Patricia Berry
  • ‘Now You See It’  by Nancy Ludmerer
  • ‘Waiting’  by Jesse Sensibar
  • ‘Scathed’ by Holly Woodward
  • ‘In the Valley of the Sun’ by Gleah Powers
  • ‘Fall on Your Knees’ by Nancy Ludmerer
  • ‘Whale in the Park’ by Stephanie Vernier
  • ‘Chameleons’ by Curtis VanDonkelaar
  • ‘Better Watch Out’  by Anna Belkine
  • ‘Them Bones, Them Bones’ by Colin Thornton
  • ‘Wedding of the Junk Dealer’s Daughter’ by Jesse Sensibar

We tried to keep the list to 15, but these stories were all so good it would be too hard to leave any one of them off the shortlist.  Congratulations to these fine authors, and stay tuned for the announcement of the winner on Friday!

 

Counting Our Lucky Stars

Winter_2015_Cover_altEvery author loves reviews, and we’re no different here at Pulp Literature.  To thank you, our generous readers, for your reviews we are offering a prize draw for a free 1-year digital subscription.

Spring 2015 cover image smallTo enter the draw, simply post a review of an issue of Pulp Literature — it could be your favourite, your least favourite, or one in between — on Amazon or Goodreads.  Enter the link on the prize entry form, and we’ll draw the winner at the end of August.Issue 7 cover

Aside from your chance to win a subscription you will also earn our deep thanks.  Reviews on these sites help make the magazine more visible to search engines and let us reach a wider audience.

There is no cost to enter the draw.  Entries close August 31st at 11:59pm Pacific time.

Entry form

Review sites:

Amazon
Goodreads

 

The Hummingbird Longlist

Thank you to all the wonderful storytellers who submitted to this years’ Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize.  Every year the number of quality stories grows, making our jobs as first judges ever more difficult.  This year we brought in a fourth prelimary judge, Katherine Howard, who helped us narrow our longlist down to 30 excellent pieces.  In no particular order the top thirty are:

  • Saturday in the Penthousehummingbirdissue7
  • Xuefei and his heart
  • Harmless
  • Silk
  • Arabesque
  • Golden Snowflake
  • Painted Nails
  • Neighborhood Watch
  • Funerals
  • Looking East from Heckethorn
  • My Brother’s Therapist
  • Texture of the Sea
  • In My Drawer
  • Scathed
  • Refugee Circus
  • Now You See It
  • Animal Eyes
  • Still Your Mother’s House
  • In the Valley of the Sun
  • Fall on Your Knees
  • Better Watch Out
  • Chameleons
  • Hell in Paradise
  • Whale in the Park
  • Them Bones, Them Bones
  • Ford
  • Button
  • The Deathbed
  • Venetian Blind
  • Ascending
  • A Mailman Drinking a Milkshake
  • Early Harvest
  • Waiting
  • The Yellow Blanket
  • The Wedding of the Junk Dealer’s Daughter

Congratulations to these authors who will remain anonymous until our final judge, Bob Thurber, has finished his deliberations, and to all the writers who submitted stories that made our job so difficult, yet enjoyable.

Stay tuned — we will be publishing the shortlist and the winners on July 15th!

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Congratulate Magpie Winner, Nicola Aime!

Magpie Award final judge Diane Tucker has revealed the three gems which will have everyone standing in line to purchase their Issue 12 copy of Pulp Literature (so order it now)!  Our winners spanned the continent, from Newfoundland to California, yet we are secretly pleased that this contest (judged blind) was won by a local Vancouver poet.  And mainly we’re glad because we’ll get to raise a toast to her in person at the book launch!  Without further ado,  Diane’s comments:

All the shortlisted poems contain clever and even beautiful imagery, emotion precisely and originally expressed, and an extraordinary amount of chutzpah. There isn’t a timid piece in the bunch.  But these three, in my opinion, do the work best.

Magpie Award ($500) to Nicola Aime for  “Dumb Love”
Judged by the contest’s own standard –  “a fusion of musicality, imagery, feeling, and thought” – “Dumb Love” is the winner in this group of poems. Every syllable in it serves the music and the rhythm and the story. The poem’s sustained metaphor, or family of metaphors, is never cheesily over-used or descends into mere punning. The poem’s perfect juggle of swooning passion and subtle and sardonic humour makes it a love poem truer than most to actual human love.  I feel it wants to be recited with a resigned smile.  And through all of this it sustains its music.  It is the most seamless of the entries, the most polished and fully-realized piece of work.

First Runner-Up: ($50) Katie Vautour for “Military Survival Training”
This is a dense, stony, jagged poem, longish but laser-focused, patient and cold and terrifying.  It’s a controlled, drawn-out pain, like a night of sleep spent clenching one’s jaw. Waking doesn’t make it better… It’s going to stay lodged in my head and make me think twice before I eat rabbit again.

Second Runner-Up: ($50) Marnie Eldridge for “Man.hunt”
Almost a complete contrast to “Military Survival Training”, “Man.hunt” is a hugely loose, flailing, overflowing tsunami of a poem.  It works as well as it does because its seemingly rambling passages have a fine strong thread running through them… Its chaotic music and gorgeous, determined fierceness sustain the patient reader.

Congratulations again to all our fine poets, and especially to Nicola!

Magpie Top 10 Shortlist!

Congratulations to these wonderful poets for being selected as top picks for our Magpie Prize!  This is an impressive pool of talent, and we are honoured to have such an embarrassment of riches in our contest.  We will unveil the winner on Thursday, so stay tuned!  Our poets, in random order:

Jed Myerssmall magpie
Daniel Aristi
Jude Neale
Marnie Eldridge

Katie Vautour
Elizabeth Armerding

Ada Maria Soto
Susie Taylor
Nicola Aime
Ruth Daniell

Meet the Judge: Bob Thurber

Pulp Literature invites short story writers from around the globe to enter our Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize.  It’s a humdinger of a contest,  judged by one of the sharpest pens on the planet, Bob Thurber.

Nothing But TroubleBob’s a short story writer’s short story writer, yet his works could be printed on the backs of beer cans to make you laugh. (Hey, now there’s a good marketing idea…) His flash fiction frequently wins online kudos at 50-Word Stories and his story collections are available on Amazon. His gritty novel Paperboy is being re-released this month by popular demand.  Bob’s stories have been printed in issue 3 and issue 6 of Pulp Literature, and he’s agreed to be our feature author for Issue 12.  (Yeah, we’re fans.)

Bob has blogged advice about the “Anatomy of a MicroFiction” on his website, but we thought it better advertising to just give you a taste of his own medicine:

Guillotine Guys
The guillotine guys handed out silk neckties and scarfs to the men and jeweled necklaces to the women. These items had belonged to previous prisoners. To the families they sold Band-Aids and iodine, steel needles and surgical thread, all in a boxed set with a pamphlet full of bad advice.hummingbird5

Think you can do better? Don’t let Bob have the last word! Get those contest entries in to us ASAP.  $300 goes to the best short fiction we can find, up to 1000 words. The deadline is June 15th, but entries are limited to 300, so get yours in now.  Enter the Contest Here!

Magpie Deadline Extended!

As the entries for the Magpie Award have been pouring in today, we at Pulp HQ have realized we will not be able to get them processed over the weekend.  So since we’re giving ourselves and extended deadline, we thought we’d give you one too:

New deadline: 11:59pm Sunday April 17th.

That means you have until midnight on Sunday to push your fledglings out of the next and send them our way.  Entry Guidelines here.

Good luck to all the entrants!

Bumblebee Brilliance!

bumblebee1Congratulations to our Bumblebee Micro-fiction Award winner, John Meyers! We had a swarm of entries, but final judge Bob Thurber was able to pick the story that carried the most weight per word count. Thank you to all our entrants for the hours of entertaining stories. To view John’s story in final form, in either print or digital version, order your copy of Issue 11 now! But because we aren’t so cruel as to make everyone wait that long, here’s the winning entry in all its glory.

Motorbike, by John Meyers

Fingers crossed, heart fluttering, you’re waiting for a redneck Hercules named Chuck to kick start his dusty Harley. Finally the motor catches, sending vibrations up the back of your baby chick neck, confirming in your seven-year old mind that this greasy-haired teenager with blood on his cowboy boots is god.  

Magpies take flight!

Poets, this is your chance to earn solid money, and what a pleasure it is for our magazine to be able to offer this opportunity to you again this year. The Magpie Award for Poetry gives $600 in rewards to the writers who can capture our judge’s eye, ear, and heart.  We are pleased to announce that last year’s Magpie winner, Diane Tucker, will be the final judge for this year’s contest.  Early bird entries begin March 1st at the discounted rate of $20 for the first poem, and all entrants receive a digital 1-year subscription to Pulp Literature. To get the poetic juices flowing, we are giving you a taste from Diane’s storehouse …

apricot

little peach, little ball of pale
sunset, soft palmful of summer

when you’ve ripened
and I cut you open
you pull away from your stone
easily; you disgorge your heart
you’ve learned
how to let the centre go

and when we really apply the heat
to you, you let yourself dry, become
leather; this sharpens all your flavours
and fills you especially full of iron

so you are for the blood
and the tongue, all this
after you’ve fed the eyes
and the nose
and the hand’s dry palm
with your mole-soft skin