Category Archives: Authors

2019 Year of Authors: 15 – 19 April

It’s not every year you get to celebrate publishing 20 issues of genre-busting literature. We want our readers to reap the rewards, and our contributors to shine in the spotlight, so every week we are offering up a selection of deeply discounted past issues, based on one of the authors, poets, or artists whose work fills the magazine’s pages. Welcome to week 15 of Pulp Literature’s Year of Authors!

15th – 19th April 2019

Monday: Ian Haight, Issue 14

Ian Haight’s collection of poetry, Celadon, won Unicorn Press’s First Book Prize, he is the editor of Zen Questions and Answers from Korea, and with T’ae-yong Hõ, he is the co-translator of Borderland Roads: Selected Poems of Kyun Hð and Magnolia and Lotus: Selected Poems of Hyesim (finalist for ALTA’s Stryk Prize) from White Pine Press. Ian currently lives and works in Germany.

Tuesday: Ingrid Jendrzjewski, Issue 15

Winner of the 2017 Bumblebee Flash Fiction Contest, Ingrid Jendrzejewski grew up in Vincennes, Indiana, and studied creative writing at the University of Evansville, then physics at the University of Cambridge. She now lives in the UK, where she is trying to get up the nerve to declutter her wardrobe. Ingrid currently serves as the Editor in Chief of FlashBack Fiction, an editor at Flash Flood, and a flash editor at JMWW, and she has just come on board as one of the co-directors of National Flash Fiction Day (UK).

Wednesday: Jaqui Hartwood, Issue 2

Jacqui Hartwood has a bachelor’s degree in Creative Writing, is the winner of a Vancouver Story Slam, and has previously published short stories. Her short story ‘Double or Nothing’ appeared in our second issue.  She is currently at work on two romantic suspense novels. 

Thursday: James Norcliffe, Issue 19

New Zealand poet James Norcliffe has published nine collections of poetry including Shadow Play (2013) and Dark Days at the Oxygen Café (2016). Recent work has appeared in Landfall, Spillway, The Cincinnati Review, SalamanderGargoyle and Flash Fiction International (Norton, 2015). In 2010 he took part in the XX International Poetry Festival in Medellin, Colombia, and in 2011 the Trois Rivières International Poetry Festival in Québec.

Friday: Jasmin Nyack, Issue 19

Jasmin Nyack refuses to confirm whether or not she has ever been captured by aliens. But something must be the cause of her newfound hobbies of sword fighting, baking, and knitting Weasley-inspired sweaters. Check out her new podcast, Couch Lecture, where Jasmin explores characters and their roles!

 

2019 Year of Authors: 8 – 12 April

Daffodils, birds singing, and select Pulp Literature issues on sale for 50% off — must be spring! It’s not every year you get to celebrate publishing 20 issues of genre-busting literature. We want our readers to reap the rewards, and our contributors to shine in the spotlight, so every week we are offering up a selection of deeply discounted past issues, based on one of the authors, poets, or artists whose work fills the magazine’s pages. Welcome to week 14 of Pulp Literature’s Year of Authors — soak up the savings!

8th – 12th April 2019

Monday: Greg Brown, Issue 1416

Greg Brown is a graduate of the MFA program in Creative Writing at the University of North Carolina-Greensboro. He is a recipient of UBC’s Roy Daniels Memorial Essay Prize, a 2018 Pushcart Prize nominee and the winner of the 2018 Grouse Grind Lit Prize for V. Short Forms. Two of his stories were longlisted for the 2018 Writers’ Trust of Canada/McClelland & Stewart Journey Prize. You can find his stories, criticism, and essays in Postscript, Paragon, The RS500, Lenses: Perspectives on Literature, and Tate Street. Oh, and those two stories nominated for the Journey Prize? They were ‘Bear’ and ‘Love’, from Issues 14 and 16, respectively. Not to brag…

Issue 16 cover art by Akem

Tuesday: Greg Walklin, Issue 9

Greg Walklin is an attorney by day and a freelance writer by night. Aside from writing for the city newspaper in Lincoln, Nebraska, his fiction has appeared in Palooka magazine, Midwestern Gothic and online at Lawyerist. In 2014 he was a finalist in Glimmer Train’s New Writers Contest.

Wednesday: Gregg Chamberlain, Issue 10

Gregg Chamberlain is a community newspaper reporter who lives in rural Ontario with his missus and four cats, who allow their humans the run of the house. His work has appeared in the Daily Science Fiction website, SciPhi Journal, Prose ‘n’ Cons Mystery Magazine, and in the Alternate Hilarities anthology series from Strange Musings Press.

Issue 10 small

Thursday: Holly Walrath, Issue 7

Holly Lyn Walrath’s poetry and short fiction has appeared in Strange Horizons, Fireside Fiction, Luna Station Quarterly, Liminality, and elsewhere. Her chapbook of words and images, Glimmerglass Girl, was published by Finishing Line Press in 2018. She holds a B.A. in English from The University of Texas and a Master’s in Creative Writing from the University of Denver.

Friday: Hugh Henderson, Issues 14 & 19

Hugh Henderson is a Vancouver-based artist who is doing a terrible job convincing himself that he knows what he is doing. He has been constructing and refining the visual landscape of the comic for over five years.  He was the cover artist for Issue 14, Spring 2017, and his comic series with Joseph Stilwell, Blue Skies Over Nine Isles appeared in both Issue 14 and 19.

2019 Year of Authors: 1 – 5 April

We know readers might be wary of good deals this week, given the unofficial holiday we start the week off with, but rest assured, this is no joke:  it’s Pulp Literature’s Year of Authors! We want our readers to reap the rewards, and our contributors to shine in the spotlight, so every week we are offering up a selection of deeply discounted past issues, based on one of the authors, poets, or artists whose work fills the magazine’s pages. Welcome to week 13 of Pulp Literature’s Year of Authors — this week belongs entirely to the G’s.

1st – 5th April 2019

Monday: Gabriel CravenIssue 17

The self-described scruffy scribbler, Gabriel Craven is a comic artist from Steveston, BC. He has an unabashed love of the pulpy side of speculative fiction, especially that which deals with post-apocalyptic wastelands.  Check out his comic ‘Adrift’, co-written with Mikayla Fawcett in issue 17.

Issue 17 cover featuring stellar artwork by Britt-Lise Newstead

Tuesday: KG McAbee, Issue 4

While KG McAbee loves monsters of all sorts, zombies are far from her favourites, as she tends to prefer both wittier repartee and a sturdier attachment of body parts. But the walking dead do give an interesting flavour to a story, much like a many-tentacled, eldritch Old One of Mr Lovecraft’s might, if tossed into a fish stew. Cthulhu paella, anyone?

Wednesday: Genni Gunn, Issue 18

Genni Gunn’s eight books include novels, short fiction, poetry, and memoir. She has also written the libretto for the opera Alternate Visions, produced in Montreal in 2007, and has translated three collections of poetry from Italian. Her novel Tracing Iris was made into a film, and her novel Solitaria was longlisted for the 2011 Giller Prize. Busy Genni Gunn was Issue 18’s featured author, with the haunting short story ‘Stones’.

Thursday: George McWhirter, Issue 9

George McWhirter is Vancouver’s first poet laureate, a Professor Emeritus at UBC, and among many other things, he is Issue 9’s featured author. Originally hailing from Ireland, he is the author of over a dozen books of poetry and fiction, and he has won numerous significant literary awards for his fiction, poetry and translations. In addition to his fairy tale SF piece ‘Stalk’ in issue 9, he was also the inaugural judge for the Magpie Award for Poetry.

Friday: Glenn Pape, Issue 16

Glenn Pape is working on aging gracefully in his old house on a cul-de-sac in Portland, Oregon. Although captivated by reading and writing poetry since childhood, he only began submitting his work upon reaching his mid-fifties. He has been published in The North American Review, The Sun, Poet Lore, and The Rhysling Anthology for science fiction, horror, and fantasy poetry, among other journals.   He was shortlisted for the 2014 Magpie Award for Poetry, and runner up in 2017, with his poem ‘Ghost Town’.

Issue 16 cover art by Akem

Pulp Literature Year 1 & 2

2019 Year of Authors: 25 – 29 Mar

It’s not every year you get to celebrate publishing 20 issues of genre-busting literature. We want our readers to reap the rewards, and our contributors to shine in the spotlight, so every week we are offering up a selection of deeply discounted past issues, based on one of the authors, poets, or artists whose work fills the magazine’s pages. Welcome to week 12 of Pulp Literature’s Year of Authors — it’s a real doozy.  Seven issues will be 50% off!

22nd – 29th March 2019

Monday: Erin Kirsh, Issue 16

Author Erin Kirsh smiling behind bookErin Kirsh is a writer and performer living in Vancouver. Her work has been published in Arc Poetry MagazineThe Quilliad, Strange Days Books, and Geist, where she took second place in their 10th Annual Literary Postcard Short Story Contest in 2014. Erin is the Executive Director of Vancouver Poetry House. Her wonderful blog, The Loosing Game, chronicles the ups and (mostly) downs of the submission process.

Issue 16 cover art by Akem

Tuesday: Erin Slaughter, Issue 17Poet Erin Slaughter in black

Erin Slaughter holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Western Kentucky University. She has been a finalist for Glimmer Train’s Very Short Fiction Contest and was nominated for a Best of the Net Award and a Pushcart Prize. You can find her writing in River Teeth, Bellingham Review, Sundog Lit, Tishman Review, and elsewhere. She is the author of two poetry chapbooks: Elegy for the Body (Slash Pine Press, 2017) and GIRLFIRE (dancing girl press, 2018), and is editor and co-founder of the literary journal The Hunger. She lives and teaches writing in Nashville.

Issue 17 cover featuring stellar artwork by Britt-Lise Newstead

Wednesday: Ev Bishop, Issues 6 & 10

Author Ev Bishop looking festive Ev Bishop is a long-time columnist with the Terrace Standard, and her other articles and essays appear across North America. Fiction’s her true love, however, and she writes in a variety of lengths and genres. Best known for her small-town contemporary romance series, River’s Sigh B & B, Ev also writes under the pen name Toni Sheridan (The Present and Drummer Boy, White Rose Publishing). Visit Ev online at www.evbishop.com, join her on Facebook, or follow her on Twitter @Ev_Bishop. She’d love to connect with you!

Issue 10 small

Thursday: FJ Bergmann, Issues 6, 1316

Author F J Bergman in steampunk gogglesF J Bergmann has manifested in Analog, Asimov’s, Apex and elsewhere in the alphabet, and functions, so to speak, as poetry editor of Mobius: The Journal of Social ChangeA Catalogue of the Further Suns (dystopian first-contact SF poems — don’t say you weren’t warned), won the 2017 Gold Line Press chapbook contest. Her humorous fantasy and science fiction has appeared in three issues of Pulp Literature with more scheduled for the near future!

Issue 13 cover by Zoran PekovicIssue 16 cover art by Akem

Friday: Fred Zackel, Issue 3 & 8

Author Fred Zackel in Hawaiian shirt in front of beach Fred Zackel is the author of Cocaine & Blue Eyes, Murder in Waikiki, and Turn Left at Paradise, among other novels and short fiction. He teaches Canadian Fiction and American Literature at Bowling Green State University in Ohio.

Issue 13 cover art by Tais TengIssue 8 cover art by Mel Anastasiou  

2019 Year of Authors: 18 – 22 Mar

We’re in week 11 of our 2019 Year of Authors! Now that you’ve had some time to get adjusted to daylight savings, why not take advantage of the increased daylight hours with some good stories from your favourite authors? 

Here’s our line-up for the eleventh week …

18th – 22nd March 2019

Monday: Emily Osborne, Issue 17

Poet Emily Osborne Standing in front of seascape with mountains in background

Emily Osborne is a researcher, translator, and poet living in British Columbia, Canada. She earned a PhD in Old Norse-Icelandic literature from the University of Cambridge and recently held a postdoctoral fellowship in medieval literature and linguistics at the University of British Columbia. She has taught mediaeval literature and poetics at Cambridge and UBC and published several scholarly articles. Her poetry has appeared in The Literary Review of Canada and Symposium, and she was runner-up for Eyewear Publishing’s first Fortnight Prize. Emily has also published translations of Old English and Old Norse poetry in academic journals and books.

Issue 17 cover featuring stellar artwork by Britt-Lise Newstead

Tuesday: Epiphany Ferrell, Issue 20

Author Epiphany Ferrell loose hair and red lipstickEpiphany Ferrell writes most of her fiction in southern Illinois at Resurrection Mule Farm, named for a mule that survived a lightning strike and was, according to sources, never “quite right” afterwards. She is an editor at Flash Fiction Magazine, and her story, ‘Every Town Has One’ appeared in Issue 20.

Issue 20 cover with tech-slum cover by Ben Baldwin

Wednesday: Eric Del Carlo, Issue 13

Eerie photo of author Eric Del Carlo

Eric Del Carlo’s fiction has appeared in Asimov’s, Analog, Strange Horizons, and many other venues. His novels include The Golden Gate Is Empty, co-written with his father Victor Del Carlo, as well as the Wartorn series published by Ace Books, co-written with Robert Asprin.

Issue 13 cover by Zoran Pekovic

Thursday: Eric Johnson, Issue 12

Eric Johnson is a northern BC artist who specializes in watercolour and India ink painting. His work has appeared in such anthologies as Cloudscape Comics’ Mega Fauna and Epic Canadiana #2 (the second a collaboration with Bevan Thomas), and Seven Stories Press’s The Graphic Canon, Vol 1 (a collaboration with Michael Stanyer).

Issue 12 cover by Melissa Mary Duncan

Friday: Erin EvansIssue 20

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, glasses and close-upErin Evans grew up on the West Coast of Canada and has worked as a high school English and Creative Writing teacher for the past 18 years. She is passionate about her two children, husband, creative projects, bookstores, tea, and good food. ‘The Hub’ is a story that snuck up on her, and it is her first publication credit, as it garnered an honourable mention from Jack Whyte and Diana Gabaldon at the Surrey International Writers’ Conference in 2017.

Issue 20 cover with tech-slum cover by Ben Baldwin

2019 Year of Authors: 11 – 15 Mar

In honour of Pulp Literature Press’s fifth anniversary and of all the people who have contributed to our success we have declared 2019 our Year of Authors, celebrating the amazing artists and authors from the first twenty issues of Pulp Literature.

Every weekday we are featuring one of these creators on our Facebook page, and the issues that person contributed to will be on sale for a whopping 50% off.  Make a note of the authors and artists you’re following and jump on these deals.  Some print issues are rare and getting scarcer, so nab them while you still can!

Here’s our line-up for the tenth week …

11th – 15th March 2019

Monday: Eileen Kernaghan, Issue 5

Featured author of Issue 5, Eileen Kernaghan is also the author of nine historical fantasy novels and a three-time winner of the Aurora Award for Canadian speculative fiction. Her latest novel, Sophie, in Shadow (Thistledown Press, 2014) is set in 1914 India. An associated novel, Wild Talent: a Novel of the Supernatural (2008) was shortlisted for the 2009 Sunburst Award for Canadian Literature of the Fantastic, while The Alchemist’s Daughter (2004) was shortlisted for the Sheila Egoff Award for Children’s Literature. As well, her short stories and poems have appeared in many North American literary and speculative publications.

Tuesday: EL Firestine, Issue 2

Erin Lee Firestine, of Issue 2 fame, enjoys creeping people out more than is probably healthy (but we don’t judge). She makes jewellery and fairy wings in her spare time, enjoys cheese in all of its wide and varied forms, and dreams of moving to Canada someday, where she plans to build a truly ludicrous number of snowmen. 

Wednesday: Elaine McDivitt, Issue 18

Author Elaine McDivitt amusingly steering boat

Elaine McDivitt is a full-time partner in a landscaping business that grows perennials for garden centres. Her past includes fifteen years of training race-horses. She has two adult children who recall their mother constantly reading to them and to herself. Nine years ago she pursued her passion for writing by taking the Humber College mentor program. She loves her book club so much she works her holidays around it. Her story, ‘The Tape’, appeared in Issue 18 as the winner of the 4th annual Raven Short Story Contest.

Thursday: Elizabeth Armerding, Issue 13

Elizabeth Armerding lives in Vancouver, BC, and enjoys bikes, condiments, and leaving an unwelcome trail of glitter. Her poem, ‘F/G/C/F (Country Love Sestina)’ breaks down the components of love and a good country music song.

Friday: Emily Linstrom, Issue 10

Emily Linstrom is an American writer and artist residing in Italy.  Her work has been featured in a number of publications including Carve Magazine, Three Rooms PressA Women’s Thing, and The Wisdom Daily. She is currently putting the finishing touches on her first novel, a Gothic horror-romance-comedy penned entirely by accident following her move overseas. Her story ‘Black Blizzard,’ a tale of the Depression-era American Dust Bowl narrated by an intrepid young fairytale enthusiast, was the 2015 Raven Short Story Contest winner.

Issue 10 small

2019 Year of Authors: 4 – 8 March

In honour of Pulp Literature Press’s fifth anniversary and of all the people who have contributed to our success we have declared 2019 our Year of Authors, celebrating the amazing artists and authors from the first twenty issues of Pulp Literature.

Every weekday we are featuring one of these creators on our Facebook page, and the issues that person contributed to will be on sale for a whopping 50% off.  Make a note of the authors and artists you’re following and jump on these deals.  Some print issues are rare and getting scarcer, so nab them while you still can!

Here’s our line-up for the ninth week…

4th March – 8th March 2019

Monday: Deborah WalkerIssue 3

Deborah Walker grew up in the most stereotypical English town in the country, but she soon high-tailed it down to London, where she now lives with her partner, Chris, and her two young children. She writes all types of science fiction, horror and fantasy, poetry and short stories. Find Deborah in the British Museum trawling the past for future inspiration. Her stories have appeared in Nature magazine’s Futures, Cosmos, Daily Science Fiction and The Year’s Best SF 18.  Read her delightful short story ‘Aunty Merkel’ in Pulp Literature Issue 3, Summer 2014.

Tuesday: Diane TuckerIssue 3 & 8

Diane Tucker: triple threat Vancouver poet, novelist, and playwright. Her poems have been published in numerous anthologies and in more than sixty journals in Canada and abroad. Her first novel, His Sweet Favour, was released by Thistledown Press in 2009. Her most recent book of poems, Bonsai Love, was released by Harbour Publishing in 2014.  Her  poem ‘Caffe Pettirosso’ won the Magpie Award for Poetry in 2015, and she was the final judge for the 2016 Magpie Award.

Wednesday: Donald Dewey, Issue 5

Donald Dewey has published 37 books of fiction, nonfiction, and drama for such houses as Little, Brown, HarperCollins, St. Martin’s Press, and Carroll and Graf. His short story, ‘The Pledge’, appeared in Issue 5. The protagonist of ‘The Pledge,’ private detective Paul Finley, is also the protagonist of The Bolivian Sailor and two other published books in the series, Wake Up and Smell the Bees and The Fantasy League Murders.

Thursday: dvsduncan, Issue 8

Born in Vancouver BC, dvsduncan now lives in New Westminster with his lovely wife (frequent PL cover artist Melissa Mary Duncan) and a troublesome cat. He holds degrees in English and Landscape Architecture but it is life that has taught him the most. His stories are all true, though not factual. Make of that what you will.

Friday: Douglas Smith, Issue 12

Douglas Smith is an award-winning Canadian author whose short fiction has appeared in over thirty countries. His books include a novel, The Wolf at the End of the World, and the collections Chimerascope and Impossibilia, and the writer’s guide, Playing the Short Game: How to Market & Sell Short Fiction. Doug is a three-time winner of Canada’s Aurora Award, and has been a finalist for the John W. Campbell Award, CBC’s Bookies Award, Canada’s juried Sunburst Award, and France’s juried Prix Masterton and Prix Bob Morane.

2019 Year of Authors: 11 – 15 Feb

In honour of Pulp Literature Press’s fifth anniversary and of all the people who have contributed to our success we have declared 2019 our Year of Authors, celebrating the amazing artists and authors from the first twenty issues of Pulp Literature.

Every weekday we are featuring one of these creators on our Facebook page, and the issues that person contributed to will be on sale for a whopping 50% off.  Make a note of the authors and artists you’re following and jump on these deals.  Some print issues are rare and getting scarcer, so nab them while you still can!

Here’s our line-up for the sixth week …

11th February – 15th February 2019

Monday: Britt-Lise Newstead, Issue 10 & 17

Britt-Lise Newstead is a storyboard artist, concept artist, and illustrator based in Halifax. She has been part of the video game industry since 2009, and the animation industry since 2015, though her interests are numerous and never satiated. Two of her pieces, ‘She Doesn’t Know She’s Small’ and ‘The Patron Saint of the Inevitable Death of the Universe’, grace Issues 10 and 17, respectively.
Issue 10 small

Tuesday: Carol Berg, Issue 10

Former software engineer Carol Berg didn’t believe she could write one novel, never mind fifteen epic fantasies, never mind win the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adult Literature. She was Issue 10‘s featured author, and the first book in her next series is due out this year. Be sure to catch her at Norwestcon 42 this April!

Issue 10 small

Wednesday: Carolyn Oliver, Issue 13

A graduate of The Ohio State University and Boston University, Carolyn Oliver lives in Massachusetts with her family. Her work has appeared in or is forthcoming from Slush Pile Magazine, Midway Journal, matchbook, and Constellations, among others. Carolyn’s work has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize and Best of the Net. Discover why all fairytales follow a common theme in her short story, ‘The Green Thread and the Blue’, in Issue 13.

Thursday: CC Humphreys, Issue 1 & 14

Footloose?He’s an actor, playwright, and fight choreographer. Oh, he’s also an award-winning novelist.  CC Humphreys is the distinguished 1st Issue feature author, appearing again in Issue 14. He’s a chimaera, like so many of our authors — and professional in every field (if his 16 published books and plethora of acting credits are anything to go by).

     

Friday: Charity Tahmaseb, Issue 15 & 19

Charity Tahmaseb has slung corn on the cob for Green Giant and jumped out of airplanes (but not at the same time). She’s worn both Girl Scout and Army green. These days, she writes fiction and works as a technical writer in St. Paul, Minnesota. Her short fiction credits include stories in Deep MagicEscape Pod, Cicada, and Pulp Literature. She’s been nominated twice for a Pushcart Prize Award, and her first novel (The Geek Girl’s Guide to Cheerleading) was a YALSA 2012 Popular Paperback pick in the Get Your Geek On category. Her work consistently impresses in our writing contests, and can be read in Issue 15 & Issue 19.

ADVENT has launched!

It’s a new year and we’re amping up our productivity with five new novels set for release in 2019! First among these is Advent by Michael Kamakana. We’ve been teasing our readers with this release for quite some time, but the day has finally come… Advent is now available for purchase on our website and Amazon!

In honour of this momentous occasion, and to get a feel for the author and the novel, here’s an interview with Michael Kamakana, originally published along side an excerpt of the novel in Issue 19.

Feature Interview

Michael Kamakana

Pulp Literature: What drew you to writing science fiction in the first place?
Michael Kamakana: I read SF as a youth—award winners, names like Clarke, Le Guin, Dick, Lem. I admired scientists like my father. I knew I myself would not be a scientist as my
interest in math and physics was… time to sleep. I was interested in fantastic escape that I could imagine possible.

PL: What titles and authors inspired you in the early days?
MK: Fountains of Paradise by Clarke, then Left Hand of Darkness by Le Guin, then The Man in the High Castle by Dick, then Neuromancer by Gibson, then The Snow Queen by de Vinge. First non-SFwould be The Great Gatsby by Fitzgerald, A Farewell to Arms by Hemingway, then Spring Snow by Mishima, then In the Labyrinth by Robbe-Grillet, then The Name of the Rose by Eco, then If on a Winter’s Night a Traveller by Calvino, then The Woman in the Dunes
by Kobo Abe, then…

PL: What kind of philosophy books do you read?
MK: I read almost entirely ‘continental’ philosophers of the 20th Century. My favourites at the moment are Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Edmund Husserl, Henri Bergson, Gilles Deleuze.

PL: You and your protagonist both survive a coma. How does your experience with trauma influence your storytelling?
MK: I always feel that when I truly understand any teaching or experience is when I can write a definitive story inspired by it. For now I keep writing, I keep hoping that someday I will understand the coma.

PL: You call the stories ‘essays.’ Why is that? Do you feel that each section is a separate topic?
MK: Well, the ‘reset’ and ‘reserve’ sections came first, and I was inspired by Munif’s ‘Endings’ to use the collective pronouns of ‘we’ and ‘they.’ Gradually both collapsing into ‘some people’, they have generalized, removed, clinical renderings of the times, not much identifiable personal psychology. I think ‘essays’ could be thought ‘fictions’ like Jorge Luis Borges.

PL: You’re a prolific writer. Do you work on more than one novel at a time?
MK: Actually I have about seven works at various stages and interest, with more ideas percolating.

PL: Did you spend time in Hawai’i as a child? How has this affected the
point of view of the narrator of your novel?
MK: I went to the islands about every winter as a child. We lived on the windward side of Oahu for a year in high school, and Father was working at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa. I still go every February to my mom’s hometown, Waimea, on the island of Kaua’i. I can pronounce words in Hawai’ian but cannot converse. I guess I am multicultural as my background is usually one of the first things to learn about me. But I am fortunate that in Canada I look mostly like a dark white guy, whereas in Hawai’i most people recognize me as part Hawai’ian. So, I have never faced much racism here in Canada. I always identified with the ‘Indians’ in Westerns, with indigenous peoples anywhere. And this work was inspired by reading Red Gold by Hemming, which recounts what happened when the Spanish and Portuguese contacted Brazilian indigenes. I just decided to reverse polarities and think of us humans as the technologically primitive and the aliens as the invaders.

Only the start is set in Hawai’i. Most of the essays are not localized as generic North American. The biographical passages are many places. As a beginning, I remember the fear of nuclear war coming to end everything on a beautiful day in Waimea, so this Advent is a different end of the world.

PL: Did you always want to be a writer?
MK:I knew I was going to be an artist of some sort, only gradually did I realize it was going to be writing. Father’s elder sister is an author, Father’s younger sister was a visual artist, so this has always been possible, valued, and I suppose reading the first story in my aunt’s first collection clarified my desires to do narrative prose. On the other, I have for many years avoided using my family as material because that had upset Father early on in his sister’s work.

PL: Do you have any hopes that Advent will change the way people think about
their lives, about aliens, about our many assumptions?
MK: I hope readers are entertained, are even just momentarily inspired to see themselves and all other humans from an ironic perspective, an existential and historical attitude.

PL: Did the process of writing Advent change the way you felt about yourself
as a coma survivor?
MK: Actually the change developed during the writing: I knew the biographical sections would come down to ‘he’ then ‘I’, but only discovered what the aliens want at about the same time I wrote it. I have always had high expectations of myself and limited beliefs in myself, so I am first happy it will be published, then reconciled somewhat to the losses of the coma. Basically, like the aliens decide: I do not know what I would be if not an author.

Get Advent on sale till February 15th and be among the first to read this stunning debut novel.

 

2019 Year of Authors: 4 – 8 Feb

In honour of Pulp Literature Press’s fifth anniversary and of all the people who have contributed to our success we have declared 2019 our Year of Authors, celebrating the amazing artists and authors from the first twenty issues of Pulp Literature.

Every weekday we are featuring one of these creators on our Facebook page, and the issues that person contributed to will be on sale for a whopping 50% off.  Make a note of the authors and artists you’re following and jump on these deals.  Some print issues are rare and getting scarcer, so nab them while you still can!

Here’s our line-up for the fifth week …

4th February – 8th February 2019

Monday: Beverley Boissery, Issue 1

Transplanted from Australia to Vancouver, BC, Beverley Boissery was slated as an up and comer by the Surrey International Writer’s Conference back in 2006 (and they do know how to pick ’em!). She usually writes young adult novels, but in Issue 1, she gives us a taste of her poetic prowess with ‘Encompassed’.

Tuesday: Bevan Thomas, Issue 12

Bevan is a prominent member of Cloudscape Comics and has contributed to many of their graphic novel anthologies as a writer and editor. He doesn’t restrict himself to any one medium or genre, and practices the art of world building through a variety of formats. He collaborated with Eric Johnson for Issue 12’s graphic short, ‘Curse of the Woods’.

     

Wednesday: Bob Thurber, Issue 3, 6, & 12

The name Bob Thurber should be familiar to you, whether it’s because you’ve been following his award-winning writing career for some time now, or you see his name pop up as the judge in our annual flash fiction contests. Renowned for his very brief stories, Bob has been called a master of Micro Fiction and a pioneer of Flash Fiction. His story, ‘The Summer of Sweet Mary (circa 1972)’, won the 2018 Story of the Year Award from 50-Word Stories. Bob’s work appears in Issues 3 & 6, and he dishes up a tension loaded tale as Issue 12’s feature author.

Thursday: Brandon Crilly, Issue 16

Educator and self-described ‘writer for life’, Brandon Crilly has been previously published by On Spec, The 2017 Young Explorer’s Adventure Guide, Third Flatiron Anthologies and other markets. He received an Honourable Mention in the 2016 Writer’s Digest Popular Fiction Awards, contributes regularly to BlackGate.com, and develops programming for Can-Con in Ottawa.

       

Friday: Brenda Carre, Issue 15

Another educator, and artist to boot! Brenda Carre writes long and short fiction with a dark, mythic twist—stories often set in locations near her home on Vancouver Island or in the Chronicles of Ardebrin, the epic fantasy series she is currently crafting. Brenda’s short fiction has appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, as well as anthologies from Fiction River and Ragnarok Press. Her piece in Issue 15 introduced the titular heroine of her upcoming novel set in Ardebrin: Gret.