All posts by Jessica Fabrizius

Featured Author: JJ Lee

It’s December, and Pulp Literature Issue 17, Winter 2018 is here! Featured author JJ Lee’s ‘Desdemone’ opens our winter issue with an exquisite Edwardian haunting of a most personal kind.

Multiple-award-nominated memoirist JJ Lee is author of The Measure of a Man: The Story of a Father, a Son, and a Suit.  Every year, following in the footsteps of ‘Fireside Al’ Maitland, he  presents a Christmas ghost story on CBC Radio in British Columbia, and ‘Desdemone’ was his Christmas 2016 oeuvre.

Pulp Literature Issue 17, Winter 2018

We’re delighted to be able to bring this story to a print audience.  This is JJ’s third short story for Pulp Literature, the first being the dystopian Spec Fic piece ‘Built to Love’ in Issue 2 and the Yuletide Lovecraft, Moorcook, Nazi mashup ‘The Man in the Long Black Coat’ in Issue 8.

You can save $2 by pre-ordering our Winter 2018 issue here … and then get JJ to sign it for you when you pick it up at the Winter Launch Party, Monday Dec 11th from 5:00 – 7:00pm at the Cottage Bistro on Main St.

To get you in the JJ mood, here’s an excerpt from Issue 8’s ‘The Man in the Long Black Coat’, a holiday story with a Lovecraftian twist:

 

The Man in the Long Black Coat

A Chthonic Christmas Tale by JJ Lee

Silesia
December 1944

I don’t remember if Mother’s eyes said it or if she spoke the words, “He’s just a boy.” I do remember feeling anger and burning shame.  I was eleven years old, the eldest. Father had been gone for years.  The weekly newsreel Die Deutsche Wochenschau showed boys my age working in factories, making shells and gun parts.  In school we were told to be “slim and strong, swift as greyhounds, tough as leather, and hard as Krupp steel.”  I thought I was until I saw Mother’s eyes that night in the winter of 1944.

Herr Mundt didn’t care.  He had arrived from the larger, Lower Silesian town of G______ in search of what he called ‘recruits.’  He dressed in the makeshift manner of the Volkssturm, the People’s Army.  He wore scuffed and muddy railroad boots, brown breeches, and an armband over his grey coat sleeve.  On his collar, Herr Mundt had pinned officer pips.  He topped his head with the kind of hat a butcher would wear.  His attire was theatrical, ersatz, outlandish, wildly officious, and, because he seemed so out of control, menacing.  From his gaze I wanted to hide.

“He has five minutes to gather warm clothes and boots, if he has any,” said Herr Mundt.

He stepped back into the snow and shadows and strode off in the direction of the neighbours.  Mother shut the door.  My legs trembled as I climbed up the stairs and went into the bedroom.  I took off my pyjamas and folded them.  I tucked them under my pillow.  I began to put on as much clothes as I could.  I stuffed more warm things into a canvas bag.  I went to the other side of the bed and leaned down to kiss Lena, my sister, on her forehead.  Her eyes opened.

“You should be asleep,” I said.

“Where are you going?”

“I don’t know.”

“Take this.”

She pulled from under the covers a tin soldier, my oldest, most treasured toy.

“Where did you find it?”  I fought the urge to snatch it from her and I held out my hand.  She put it in my palm.  I saw the chipped paint on its shako, the blue on its tunic nearly worn through from play, the bent rifle, and the blankness of its face.  It made me think of Father.

“Keep it until I come back.”

I tucked her in, kissed her again, and went downstairs.  Mother said, “You can hide in the forest.”

“I don’t think they will let me.”

A pistol cracked.  A woman’s wail cut through the night.  A minute later, Herr Mundt thumped on our door.  “Frau Steiner.”

Mother clambered into the cellar and came back up holding hunting boots.  “They’re still too big,” I said.

“It doesn’t matter.  You need boots.”

“Frau Steiner.”  Herr Mundt hammered on the door.  I put them on.  I didn’t have time to say goodbye to Mother.

I stumbled after Herr Mundt to a small truck idling in front of the church.  He opened the back and waved his pistol.  I climbed in.  Three other boys from the village — Jens, Rudy, and Zeydl — sat shivering on the side benches.

“Stay in here until we let you out.  If any of you try to run, you will wish you hadn’t.”  Herr Mundt shut us in and we rode without speaking.  At first I could hardly see, but my eyes adjusted to the dimness.  The walls were wood slats with no space between them.  A tarpaulin covered the top.  In one corner, there was a small tear that flapped in the wind.  Through it fell the palest light from the night sky …

Read the rest of the story in Pulp Literature Issue 8, Autumn 2015.

 

Author News: Anat Rabkin

We love the eclectic nature of our magazine. Literary fiction, poetry, Sci-fi, short comics, and so much more come together in each issue to offer a wide variety for the diverse palettes we are serving.  Sometimes, the appearance of comics in a literary magazine can come  as a shock, but we believe that when words and images come together, another layer of depth is added to the story.

Anat Rabkin

Anat Rabkin is one talented artist and writer whose work has been featured in Issue 9 with ‘Forbidden Fruit’ and Issue 13 with ‘It Rained Then, Too’. Click here to browse back issues… 

She is also the author and illustrator of the webcomic Seraphim: Tales of Love and Courage, set to return from hiatus before the end of 2017!

Currently, Anat is hard at work on a Kickstarter campaing with Cloudscape Comics.  Her comic, ‘Soundblind’, is set to appear in their anthology, Swan Song, a massive, 12×12 anthology of comics about music, and life, and changing the world.

Find the full line-up and run-down of the campaign here

Anat Rabkin returns to Pulp Literature in the upcoming Issue 17, Winter 2018 with her first prose-only short story, ‘For the Love of Grey.’  It’s take on what awaits us in perdition, and one woman’s determination to remain positive.  You can pre-order issue 17 with a $2 discount until December 10th.

Meet Anat at the Winter Launch

Join us to launch Issue 17 at the Cottage Bistro on Main Street.  Anat will be reading from ‘For the Love of Grey’, and there will also be readings from JJ Lee, Emily Osborne, Misha Handman and the winners of the 2017 Cedric prize.

Winter Book Launch
Monday 11 December, 5:00 – 7:00pm
The Cottage Bistro
4470 Main Street, Vancouver BC

Free!  RSVP here

 

 

 

Raven Short Story Contest Winners 2017

No need to hold your breath any longer:  the results are in!

The Raven Short Story Contest winner for 2017

is Elaine McDivitt with her story, ‘The Tape’.

‘The Tape’ caught judge Brenda Carre in its powerful stream of consciousness .

“Who does not remember the striking cover of The Female Eunuch by Germaine Greer? It provided a visual punch that the story made good on right to the end.  I found the circular theme of tape in Virginia’s haunting narration a gripping read. The unique cadence really supported the sense of horror and realization unlocked at a garage sale.” – Brenda Carre

Coming in as a close runner up, Kerry Craven‘s story, ‘Meggie’.

“This was a very interesting fairy-tale-esque exploration of the dehumanization of Dementia. Through Meggie’s surprising transformation into a new being she is able to move past grief at least for awhile. I loved the Baba Yaga quality of the magical young woman with the sack full of all possibilities. I would love to see the dialect trimmed somewhat. With a bit of editing this has the ‘whiskermarks’ of a fine story.” – Brenda Carre

Both of these stories will appear in Pulp Literature Issue 18, Spring 2018, and the winners take home $300 and $75 respectively as their prizes.

Honorable Mentions go to Alex Reece Abbott for ‘My Brother Paulie: A Domestic Space Odyssey’, and Charity Tahmaseb for ‘The Potato Bug War’.

Congratulations to all of these writers, and special thanks to judge Brenda Carre! Pulp Literature Press is grateful for the abundance of talent and hard work that was poured into all of the submissions for the 2017 Raven Short Story Contest.

Our next contest, the Bumblebee Flash Fiction Contest for stories up to 750 words long, opens January 1st, 2017.  We hope to see you there!

Track your submissions at Duotrope

The 2017 Raven Contest Shortlist

The big announcement for the Raven Short Story Contest is just around the corner! For now, we are excited to announce the incredible authors who have made it on the Raven 2017 shortlist, alphabetically by author first name.

The Raven Short Story Contest Shortlist

Alex Reece Abbott, ‘My Brother Paulie: A Domestic Space Odyssey’

Brian Dang, ‘Edgeless’

C.E. Mandybura, ‘Monkey Days’

Charity Tahmaseb, ‘The Potato Bug War’

Daniel Beaumont, ‘Shifting Bodies’

Dustin He, ‘Carrion Feeder’s Pedigree’

Elaine McDivitt, ‘The Tape’

Jessica Oesterle, ‘Respira’

Joni Hobbs, ‘Lavender Rhy and The Moon Room’

Kerry Craven, ‘Meggie’

Judge Brenda Carre’s chosen winners will be announced tomorrow, November 15th! Until then, we would like to thank everyone for their submissions and we wait alongside you with bated breath …