All posts by PULP Literature

Membership has its Rewards

You may have noticed we are not running a Kickstarter campaign this year.  Instead we are relying on regular subscriptions, our Patreon page, and our new Pulp Literati memberships to keep the magazine afloat in 2018 and beyond.

Many of you have already switched to one of these three subscription methods, for which we thank you!  If you haven’t yet renewed and are wondering which method is best for you, here are the pros and cons of each:

Regular Subscription

  • Least expensive option
  • Prices are in Canadian dollars
  • One payment per year (will automatically renew unless you tell Paypal otherwise)
  • No-frills.  All you get is your quarterly issue in print or ebook.  But that’s still a big issue of fabulous stories, artwork, and poetry delivered to your door or inbox each season

Patreon

  • Prices are in US dollars, so slightly more expensive
  • You can choose your payment amount from $1 a month and up
  • Monthly payments are easier to budget around
  • No renewal hassles
  • Access to Patron-only blog content, and patron-only submissions inbox
  • An assortment of gifts at ascending levels of support, including post cards, colouring books, writing guides, manuscript critiques and more
  • The warm fuzzy feeling of providing the monthly support that ensures we keep operating year round

Pulp Literati Membership

  • Prices are in Canadian dollars
  • Memberships start at $5 per month (choose Patreon for smaller amounts)
  • Monthly payments are easier to budget around
  • No renewal hassles
  • An assortment of gifts at ascending levels of support, including post cards, colouring books, writing guides, manuscript critiques and more
  • By not using a crowdfunding middleman, more of your money goes directly to Pulp Literature Press
  • The warm fuzzy feeling of providing the monthly support that ensures we keep operating year round

People have asked us which method we prefer they use.  The answer is, we honestly don’t mind.  We are grateful for your support however it comes, and we want you to choose the method that works best for you.

Cheers, and thank you so much for your support!

Short Fiction Submissions Open till December 5th

Calling all writers!  We have a very short submissions opening period on right now!

For this period we are specifically looking for

  • Science Fiction.  We like all forms of spec fic, from alternate history to space opera.  But it’s been a while since we’ve had much good old fashioned hard SF come through the inbox.  Send us your best!
  • Mystery. We’re always well-served with the cozy Stella Rymans and the time-travelling Seven Swans, but we’d also like to see some shorter whodunits. Have you got an intriguing and original mystery that’s 5000 words or under?  Send it in.
  • Stories by Indigenous Canadians.  Since most of us in BC are guests on First Nations’ territories, we’d love to print more stories by the descendants of Canada’s first people.

Submission guidelines, form, and pay rates here

Please note that due to the large number of submissions we receive we can’t reply personally to every submission.  If you submitted in a previous opening period and haven’t heard from us, we are unable to take the story.  If we have contacted you to say its still under consideration, be patient.   Sometimes it takes well over a year to find the right issue for a story we like.

 

There’s still time to enter EVENT Mag’s Spec Writing Contest!

EVENT Magazine presents a smashing new contest for writers who like to experiment:

The “Let Down Your Hair” Speculative Writing Contest

Are you tired of magazines telling you they just don’t print science fiction?  Are you worried your poem has too many goblins to be eligible for such-and-such contest?  Fret no more, because here is a contest where the only limit (other than the 1800 word limit) is your wicked imagination.  Here’s your chance to write work featuring time travel, alchemy, super powers, ghosts, dystopian societies, teleportation, robots with human emotions, humans with robot emotions, talking dogs, talking dolls, mutants, cruel wizards, very old men with enormous wings …

But hurry! The contest deadline is November 20. It’s open to any genre, and the Grand Prize is $1,000, with a $250 Runner-Up (judged by Vancouver’s own Amber Dawn).

Full contest details are here

Happy NaNoWriMo Eve!

Yes, to some, it’s Hallowe’en, to others its All Saints’ Eve, but for many writers it’s the day before we plunge into a month of furious writing, in an effort to churn out a novel in 30 days.

Can it be done?  It certainly can.  Write 2000 words a day for 30 days and you have 60,000 words — the bones of a good novel.  And you can easily write 2000 words in a couple of hours if you know where you’re going and don’t self-edit along the way (save all that editing for December and January).

So here’s the big secret:  spend 5 minutes at the end of the planning.  Jot down key plot points, twists, character growth, and other elements you want to incorporate in tomorrow’s two thousand words.  That way, when you wake up in the morning, the hard part’s done and you can let the words flow right away.

To get you started, we’ve packaged up the first few pages of our writing journal, The Writer’s Boon Companion: Thirty Days Towards an Extraordinary Volume by Mel Anastasiou.  This excerpt contains a Day 1 prompt: try it out tonight and be ready to hit the road rolling tomorrow morning!

Get your free Day 1 excerpt of The Writer’s Boon Companion

If you found that helpful, why not continue on with the wise guidance of Thaddeus and the  Robot Muse?  Boon Companion is 15% off this month, and as an extra bonus, we’ll send a free pdf to everyone who orders off the website.  Order your copy here.

Hallowe’en Special on Spooky 16

The Autumn issue of Pulp Literature is spectacularly spooky this year.  We have no fewer than two ghosts and one ghost town, three very different end-of-life experiences, ghouls in coffee shops, unidentified monsters in the subway, and a scarily low price of $2.99 on Amazon.com until Hallowe’en!

Pulp Literature Issue 16, Autumn 2017

With authors like kc dyer, Brandon Crilly, Rina Piccolo, Patrick Bollivar, Susan Pieters, Oak Morse, FJ Bergman, Mel Anastasiou, Leah Komar, Greg Brown, JM Landels, and Glenn Pape, this is an issue you don’t want to miss!

Submissions are Open for Pride Week

It’s Pride Week in Vancouver!  To celebrate, we are specifically requesting submissions from the LGBTQIA+ community during the first week of our August submissions period.  If you would like to self-identify in the submissions form please do; but also don’t feel you have to.  If your story is accepted you’ll have the choice whether to self-identify or not.  We certainly won’t out you without permission.

Submission Guidelines

Please read our submission guidelines carefully.  Due to the high volume of submissions we receive, we can’t reply personally to every author.

We request that each writer submit only one story during this week. However, you are also welcome to submit a second story during the remaining three weeks of the month.

Everyone else, don’t worry — we are open for the entire month of August.  We look forward to receiving your fabulous fiction after August 7th!

Happy writing, and happy Pride week!

Guidelines and submission form here

Enter to win a copy of Allaigna’s Song on Goodreads!

Missed picking up a copy of Allaigna’s Song: Overture  by JM Landels at our launch on Monday?  Well, you may have missed out on a roaring good time, but you don’t need to miss out on the book.  In fact you can snag one for free on Goodreads until tomorrow!

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Allaigna's Song by J.M. Landels

Allaigna’s Song

by J.M. Landels

Giveaway ends July 15, 2017.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway

And of course, if you’ve already read the book, we’d love it if you left a review!

Allaigna's Song: Overture by JM Landels

When Allaigna was seven she almost sang her baby brother to sleep — forever.  She may not be heir to her mother’s titles and secrets, but she has inherited her grandmother’s dangerous talent for singing music into magic.  As her education proceeds from nursery to weapons ground to the rank of royal page, it becomes increasingly hard to keep her heritage and abilities hidden.

“Beautiful writing and gripping storytelling throughout.”

“Allaigna, Lauresa, and Irdaign are tough, flawed, and appealing heroines”

“Superb writing, a gripping tale.”

“Great tension, big world, perfect pacing, intriguing politics [and] lovely magic.”

“Magically unputdownable.” 

Cover Reveal: Allaigna’s Song Overture

You’ve already seen the beautiful painting by Melissa Mary Duncan … now here’s what the cover of Allaigna’s Song: Overture looks like with lovely custom-embellished titles by our talented designer Kris Sayer!

We can’t wait to hold the real thing in our hands!

You can reserve your own signed copy through the Eventbrite page, and pick it up at our launch at Steamworks Brew Pub on July 10th.

And the Winner of the 2017 Magpie Award for Poetry is …

Oak Morse of Lawrenceville, Georgia, for his poem ‘Garbage Disposal‘.

Says Judge Renée Sarojini Saklikar:

Everything is working in this fine poem: the six stanzas contain in total 68 well-crafted lines, where form and the longer line work in tandem to please the eye and ear, both sense and syntax engaged.  A great title, not too on the nose. There is unity of voice, were the third person is taken up with confidence and consistently employed. Enjambment, where the sense of one line folds  over and into another, creating opportunity of double-meaning, is a highlight and a measure of why this poem wins first place:  it’s an incanation, precise and yet metaphorically spacious enough that we can read any number of desires within its precise domestic scenario.  I think real poetic skill is involved in creating the longer line and then maintaining tension.  Here we have concrete verbs and repetition doing the work.  Worth re-reading and worth saying aloud. High praise.

‘Garbage Disposal’ will be published in the Autumn 2017 issue of Pulp Literature but in the meantime you can hear some of Oak Morse’s spoken word poetry here.

The two runners up were Leah Komar of Danville, Pennsylvania for ‘Krang‘ and Glenn Pape of Portland, Oregon for ‘Ghost Town‘.

First Runner Up, ‘Krang’:  a tough poem, about tough painful relations.  Raw, authentic, searing.  Unity of voice, in that the speaker of the poem consistently addresses another, “you”, putting the reader in this uncomfortable and compulsively readable situation.  We squirm when we go along with the story.  Strong visceral language.  Packs a punch and then some.  Great title.

Second Runner Up, ‘Ghost Town’:  Okay, I loved this poem, a kind of film noir meets country and western sturm und drang .  Here we have rhyme at the service of both rhythm and longing: the simple line breaks work very well and surprise us with unexpected turns.  Precise verbs, precision images, great cadence. This one I’m gonna carry in my pocket.  Oh yeah. Great title.

Each of the runners-up receives $50 along with publication in Issue 16.

Huge thanks to our judges Daniel Cowper and Renée Saklikar, who put so much time and care into choosing our shortlist and winners.  Here are Renée’s overall comments:

The three winners are to be commended for creating work that pleases the senses, exploring a range of issues, keeping an eye and ear on image and rhythm: there’s music in here, sure, along with plenty of story.  Congratulations to all the poets who submitted work.  A pleasure to reach each one.  Readers will notice that I praise the title of each poem selected: titles, in my opinion, are mystical things, very hard to get right, and each of the poems selected bear titles that are ineffably correct.

Congratulations to our winning poets.  We can’t wait to publish these fine poems!

The Hummingbird Prize for Flash Fiction is open until June 15th.  Guidelines here.  Subscribe to our free newsletter to stay up to date on all contests and openings.

What Mothers Want Most

Flowers, schmowers.  Nine out of ten mothers agree:  what they want most for Mother’s Day is time alone with a good book.  And we’re here to help.

From now until Mother’s Day you can send mum a copy of Stella Ryman and the Fairmount Manor Mysteries by Mel Anastasiou and we’ll send her a copy of Pulp Literature Issue 14 as a gift from us.

Or, if you really want to shower mum with appreciation all year long, give her a subscription to Pulp Literature and we’ll add in both Stella Ryman and the soon to be released Allaigna’s Song: Overture by JM Landels for only $10 more.

Stella + Issue 14, print:  $17.95

Stella + Issue 14, eBook: $6.99

 

Mother’s Day Subscription bundle, print: $60

Mother’s Day Subscription bundle, eBook: $27.99

 

Be sure to drop us a line at info(at)pulpliterature.com to let us know her address, and we’ll even send an e-card on Mother’s Day.  Now all you need to do is arrange that time alone for her to read …

And if this is a gift for yourself?  Don’t worry, we won’t tell. Besides, you deserve it!