2019 Year of Authors: 17 – 21 June

Everyday this week, the sun lingers just a bit longer — but these deals won’t! Take advantage of all that extra natural light as we build towards the the summer solstice and the 24th week of Pulp Literature’s Year of Authors! 

17th – 21st June 2019

Monday: Marnie EldridgeIssue 12

Marnie Eldridge lives a rather quiet life in Fallbrook, California, with her
two amazing children and stellar spouse who support her writing life as fiercely
as she supports their daily wellbeing.

Issue 12 cover by Melissa Mary Duncan

Wednesday: Marta Salek, Issue 7

Marta Salek lives out in the hills of Australia with her partner and assorted fluffy roosters, chickens, sheep, alpacas, and one dog (who may or may not have fleas). When not working, she passes the time trying to grow vegetables and running over irrigation pipe with her ride-on mower. In a past life, she spent her days programming (or screaming at) computers and writing lengthy emails which were reported to give her managers headaches. Now, she’s more gainfully occupied as a nurse, which legitimately allows her to amuse herself by asking people about their bowel habits. Marta’s computer is infested with short stories and a handful of novels at varying stages of completion. Some of the former have appeared in
publications such as Aurealis, SF&F, Perihelion SF and Freeze Frame Fiction. The latter lurk. And wait.

Thursday: Mary Rykov, Issue 2 & 9

Mary H Auerbach Rykov is a Toronto-based music therapist, editor, and educator whose research, poems and songs are found in literary and academic journals. Mary serves as proofreader for Pulp Literature and freelances as a scholarly-academic editor.

Friday: Matilda Berke, Issue 17

Matilda Berke has been recognized by YoungArts, the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, the LA Tomorrow Prize, the Molotov Cocktail’s Shadow Award, and the LA Youth Poet Laureate competition, among others. She will be double majoring in English and Economics at Wellesley College. In her free time, she hopes to take up sailing and to read as many books as possible.

Issue 17 cover featuring stellar artwork by Britt-Lise Newstead

Tuesday: Matthew Hooton, Issue 11

Matthew Hooton is best known for his prize-winning novel Deloume Road, published with Knopf Canada and Jonathan Cape UK. Matthew has also written fiction and nonfiction for a variety of newspapers, magazines, and journals. He is a PhD candidate at the University of Adelaide in Australia.

The Hummingbird Flash Fiction Contest Closes Saturday

Just a few left to enter the Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize, so polish up your flashiest flash fiction for submission!

Looking for inspiration? Peruse these snippets from past Hummingbird Contest winners. All that furious fluttering should get the juices flowing.

2018 Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize Winner, Issue 21
‘The Angler’
by Nicholas Christian

It’s said Jeki la Njambe has one crow’s foot and an antelope’s hoof besides. Jeki, they say, huddles around little liver-pecked fires, has one arm and it’s a real Misha. They say he fishes with it and you’ll know it’s that time by the smell of wet maple and iron-wood, or the whistling of hollow bamboo. Sure, they ramble such as it’s cooked, but you don’t go blaming a fire for making smoke. So just gather your ears from the field. I’m to straighten things, if my name ain’t Jeki la Njambe, and I tell you I know the right of it …

2017 Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize Winner, Issue 17
‘Just Down the Hall’
by Jeanette Topar

Truth was, Mrs Cole had become a little afraid of 902.
Late in the evenings she’d hear 902’s footsteps slide across the tiled hallway, hesitating outside her door. “Is this my place?” her neighbour would ask. Mrs Cole would mute the volume on her TV and hold her breath as she sat quietly in her tidy living room waiting for the woman to shuffle away. The last few times Mrs Cole had encountered her, 902 was wearing nothing but a gray slip that blended with the colour of her skin and matched her hair — she appeared little more substantial than a shadow or dust mote hovering in the hall …

2016 Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize Winner, Issue 13
‘Xuefei and his heart’
by Rebecca Wurz

Xuefei sat on a metal stool in the corner of the operating theatre. He’d been awake all night, and now, sitting in the quiet of the deserted room, he felt drowsy. He had transported the heart of the criminal executed at dawn from the prison infirmary to the university hospital’s surgical suite, built especially for this demonstration. American transplant surgeons, collaborating with Chinese colleagues, were scheduled to do the first heart transplant on Chinese soil …

2015 Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize Winner, Issue 9
‘The Last Neanderthals’
by Christina Crocker Escribano

You say, No one is going to eat us, but I know better. The path of the forest is necklaced in footprints. The surface of the snow is scuffed and bloodied. They left no remains of skin or bone, just a fistful of hair that looks like our own. We stop and watch, for a long time, as if the blood was an outline, a shadow, a spirit blooming in the ice. You say the soul lifts from the body, but I see that it doesn’t …

2014 Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize Winner, Issue 5
Here I Lay Down My Heart
by Rob Taylor

Hayim lifted Mima toward the dhow.  The captain knelt, grabbed her by her armpits and lifted her up, then lowered her into the hull.  Hayim tossed in his duffle bag and for a moment, in the thin skim of ocean and sand that skirts Bagamoyo, stood apart from all that mattered in his world.  Then he hoisted himself on board. Mima was already playing with the livestock and making friends with the other children. In the weeks since their arrival in Tanzania she had learned a mouthful of Swahili and was now in full song.  Samaki! Kuku! Mbuzi! she pointed and guessed, and the children laughed and nodded and were impressed.  Hayim climbed atop a mound of rice bags, maybe seven or eight deep, and pressed his duffle bag into the curve of the hull, punching it here and there with his fists, pounding out their shape.  Between punches images of Tel Aviv flashed in his mind — their old apartment, the table and chairs, dishes and books he’d filled it with. Those few weeks when Mima had gone to preschool and life had felt normal and the word normal had plumped with meaning.  Then Hayim lay down and his mind cleared …

The 2019 Hummingbird Flash Fiction Prize close June 15th. We hope to see your submission soon!

Read Hummingbird Contest winners and runners-up of years past in Issue 5, Issue 9, Issue 13, Issue 17, and Issue 21.
 Issue 5,  Winter 2015
 Issue 9, Winter 2016
 Issue 13, Winter 2017
 Issue 17, Winter 2018
Issue 21, Winter 2019

 

Pulp Literature Year 1 & 2

2019 Year of Authors: 10 – 14 June

It’s not every year you get to celebrate publishing 20 issues of genre-busting literature. We want our readers to reap the rewards, and our contributors to shine in the spotlight, so every week we are offering up a selection of deeply discounted past issues, based on one of the authors, poets, or artists whose work fills the magazine’s pages. Welcome to week 23 of Pulp Literature’s Year of Authors!

10th – 14th June 2019

Monday: Laura KosturIssue 6

Born and raised in beautiful British Columbia, Canada, Laura Kostur finds inspiration from her surroundings and the wide variety of people drawn to the West Coast. Now employed in Communications with the Federal Government of Canada, Laura enjoy a job that allows her to write and edit every day, while interacting with a wide variety of people, and being of service to the public. When not at work, or working on her next novel, Laura can be found cutting and thrusting her way through classes at Academie Duello, a school of European Swordplay and Western Martial Arts. Laura currently works, fights and writes in Vancouver, British Columbia, where she lives with her husband and possibly a dog, if enough people pester the aforementioned spouse into letting her adopt one.

Wednesday: Leah Komar, Issue 16

The geographically diverse Leah Komar grew up in Syracuse and Central Pennsylvania. She attended college in New Orleans and Kyoto, and she has since then lived in Toyama and Austin. She now lives in Tokyo. Her poem, ‘Krang’, was the runner up for the 2017 Magpie Award for Poetry.

Issue 16 cover art by Akem

Thursday: Margaret Kingsbury, Issue 5

Margaret Kingsbury lives in Nashville Tennessee, where she writes, teaches English, and works at a used bookstore. Her poetry and short fiction have appeared in Battlerunes: Writings on War and Expanded Horizons. She is passionate about storytelling, helping to promote diverse and marginalised voices, and parenting from a feminist and scientific perspective.

Friday: Maria Pascualy, Issue 19

Image result for maria pascualyMaria Pascualy lives in Tacoma, Washington, where she writes in a little white house. Her writing has appeared in Panoply, Mulberry Fork Review, and Hobo Camp Review. Her poem, ‘First Date’, will give you an intimate glimpse into an eerie first date.

Tuesday: Mark Mitchell, Issue 5

Mark J Mitchell’s poetry has been published in several hundred magazines and a handful of anthologies over the years, in addition to some novels and chapbooks. His collection, Detective Movie, is quintessential pulp poetry and we fell in love with the tone. 

There’s Never Been a Better Time

There’s never been a better time for many aspects of our authorial lives, including re-issuing works. I’m very grateful that my work can go out in re-issue. However, it’s not a process I take any more lightly than a first publication of a novel.

You owe it to all of us to get on with what you’re good at. – WH Auden.

In recent days I’ve been working on a re-issue of one of my murder mystery novels. This one set in 1934 Hollywood and starring an amateur sleuth schoolteacher with ambitions to star on the silver screen. She finds the dead body of a famous actor on her sofa.

Nevertheless, it’s wise to know when to stop. When I revise, I remember Auden, and how he wished to un-publish poems he wrote when he was young. I read in The Atlantic that his wish would have included, to our loss, one of his most enduring and admired lines, “We must love one another or die.”

I hope you’ll have another brilliant week in your writing career. Cheers Mel.

There’s a new Stella Ryman book in town: The Labours of Mrs Stella Ryman.

Mel Anastasiou writes The Fairmount Manor Mysteries series, starring Mrs Stella Ryman, The Hertfordshire Pub Mysteries series, starring Spencer Stevens, and the Monument Studios Mysteries starring Frankie Ray as The Extra. Mel is Senior Acquisitions Editor with Pulp Literature Press.

If you enjoy reading Mel Anastasiou’s writing tips, get her pocket-sized writing guide, The Writer’s Boon Companion: Thirty Days Towards an Extraordinary Volume, here

Motivates, organizes, encourages, inspires.

 

2019 Year of Authors: 3 – 7 June

Blooms maxed out, baby birds bumbling from their nests, and breezes that aren’t bracing … How is it already June?!  Well, there’s only a limited window of time before August swaggers in and ruins the fun — two months, to be exact — so buy books that are guaranteed to fill long hours at the beach or amuse around the campfire.  Week 22 is here, and it will be gone before you know it!

3rd – 7th June 2019

Monday: KM VaghelaIssue 2

KM Vaghela is an avid reader who sometimes writes and holds a MFA in fiction from the University of Maryland. Being a lecturer, a spouse, and a parent graciously allows for experiences and reflections worthy enough to warp, just a little, and share.

Tuesday: Kris Sayer, Issue 2, 5, 6, 10, 11, 15

What can we say about Kris Sayer? Kris Sayer is an independent game developer, illustrator, graphic designer and comic warrior. In the rare times she’s not drawing, she can be found making (often elaborate) costumes and self- studying swordplay (and spoonplay). She is the artistic-half of Dingo Games, the viking-half of Weald Comics, and a regular contributor to the likes of Pulp Literature and Cloudscape Comics. Boiled down, Kris is a maximum storyteller, artist, and life-liver.

Issue 10 small

Wednesday: Krista Wallace, Issue 6

Krista Wallace is a writer, musician, and actor in the Vancouver area. When she is not in her cubby hole writing fantasy and short fiction, she is likely singing jazz, or working with talented young people in musical theatre. She has a fabulous Significant Other and two (mostly) adult kids who simply refuse to be plumbers.  Her story ‘The Inner Light’ won the first ever Raven contest, and is based on the cover of Issue 6 by Tais Teng.

Thursday: Kristene Perron, Issue 20

Kristene Perron has been shot, stabbed, drowned, run over and thrown from a building. During her ten years as a professional stunt woman, she learned all the interesting ways a person can get injured or die and then applied this unique education to her fiction. She is the co-author of the adventure science fiction series Warpworld, the 2010 winner of the Surrey International Writers’ Conference Storyteller Award, and a 2015 Writers of the Future finalist. Her stories have appeared in Escape PodDenizens of Darkness, Canadian Storyteller MagazineThe Barbaric Yawp, and Hemispheres Magazine. Her friends wish she would stop talking about cats.

Issue 20 cover with tech-slum cover by Ben Baldwin

Friday: Laird Long, Issue 3

Laird Long pounds out fiction in all genres. Big guy, sense of humour; been freelancing for twelve years, free-styling for more. Tends to speak in short clips, write in long-hand. His penned credits included in the magazines Albedo One, Baen’s UniverseSherlock Holmes Mystery Magazine, The Mammoth Book of New Comic Fantasy, The Mammoth Book of Jacobean Whodunits, The Mammoth Book of Perfect Crimes and Impossible Mysteries, and the action-accounting adventure novel No Accounting for Danger.

Issue 13 cover art by Tais Teng

Sunshine, Writing, and Stephen King

I walked and made no effort to think – an old trick from my writing days. Work your body, rest your mind, let the boys in the basement do their jobs.

Stephen King, Bag of Bones.

Writing conferences are thick with authors for whom Stephen King’s On Writing is a great support. Certainly, Stephen King’s words resonate with me as well.

I’ve always been a great believer in letting inner writers do their jobs. Not only does it save work, but it feels good  to put one’s trust in the driven, mysterious inner self that makes a career in writing possible.

Furthermore, these kinds of happy and relaxed thoughts often grow tall in golden sunshine. Take a break when the weather is particularly fine, and try not to feel even one percent guilty. Instead, continue to cultivate an appreciation and gratitude for a holiday from toil and ambition.  The writing work we love will be waiting for us upon our return.

I hope you’ll have another brilliant week resting from, and returning to, your writing career.

Cheers Mel

There’s a new Stella Ryman book in town: The Labours of Mrs Stella Ryman.

Mel Anastasiou writes The Fairmount Manor Mysteries series, starring Mrs Stella Ryman, The Hertfordshire Pub Mysteries series, starring Spencer Stevens, and the Monument Studios Mysteries starring Frankie Ray as The Extra. Mel is Senior Acquisitions Editor with Pulp Literature Press.

If you enjoy reading Mel Anastasiou’s writing tips, get her pocket-sized writing guide, The Writer’s Boon Companion: Thirty Days Towards an Extraordinary Volume, here

Motivates, organizes, encourages, inspires.

 

2019 Year of Authors: 27 – 31 May

It’s not every year you get to celebrate publishing 20 issues of genre-busting literature. We want our readers to reap the rewards, and our contributors to shine in the spotlight, so every week we are offering up a selection of deeply discounted past issues, based on one of the authors, poets, or artists whose work fills the magazine’s pages. Welcome to week 21 of Pulp Literature’s Year of Authors!

20th – 24th May 2019

Monday: Keltie Zubko, Issue 19

Keltie Zubko is a Western Canadian writer who divides her time between Vancouver Island and Alberta. She has an extensive background writing about freedom of speech legal cases, but now prefers to explore our human relationship with technology in her short stories and novels.  Her story ‘Towing the Mustang’ was a runner up in the 2017 Surrey International Writers’ Conference Storyteller’s Award.

Tuesday: Kerry Craven, Issue 18

Kerry Craven is an English and creative writing teacher in Oshawa, Ontario. She has always been an avid reader, and after two decades of teaching English literature and creative writing, she began to apply what she learned to her own short stories and poems. Currently, she is branching out into the writing of middle grade fiction. Kerry is a great lover of dogs, and promises that no dog will ever die in her stories.  Her short story ‘Meggie’ was the runner up in the 2017 Raven Short Story Contest.

Wednesday: Kimberleigh Roseblade, Issue 4

Kimberleigh Smithbower Roseblade has one of the most interesting and appropriate last names you may come across. She considers herself to be one of those dreamers and doers that sees her glass as half full as opposed to half empty. Her heart beats to the rhythms of Western Martial Arts, music making, slam poetry, and any activity that gets her feet (and the rest of her) wet and her blood pumping. She hopes to shine light onto others living with incurable and chronic illnesses by being raw and open about her own struggles and her own victories.

Thursday: Kirsty Favell, Issue 6

Kirsty Favell is a UK-based commercial copywriter. For as long as she can remember she has also been a ‘closet’ creative writer. Her first novel, The Magical Adventures of the Oldest Rockers in Town, was published last year, finally outing her as the permanently confused ‘executive-hippy’ she really is.

Friday: KL Mabbs, Issue 4

KL Mabbs grew up wanting to write about heroes the way Robert E. Howard and Edgar Rice Burroughs did, with passion and emotion. He met the magician in ‘Death of Me’ very much how it is described in the story. Three minutes later, when he walked back the same way, the magician was gone. Such is the way of inspiration. Look for KL Mabbs’s Spellsword, Wolf: A Military P.A.C. Novel, and The God’less Saga.

Tagline Tip for Storytelling Magic

It’s tricky — sifting through tip after tip for our  writing careers to find ideas and strategies, searching, above all, for those that suit our unique schedules, rhythms, and working styles.

Here’s one great tip to help almost every writer:

This one-minute tip  serves us all. After that, you can repeat it anytime for the same story or another project…

Write out your tag line.

Write the whole story in a sentence, and the task becomes clear. It’s such a useful practice, and so quick, that it works like magic for most storytelling. Furthermore, it takes only moments to jot it down. Here’s mine:

Mrs Stella Ryman is an octogenarian sleuth, trapped in a down-at-heel care home. You’d be cranky, too.

For more on writing tag lines, I recommend Blake Snyder’s engaging and invaluable Save the Cat.

 I hope you’ll have another brilliant week in your writing career. Cheers Mel

There’s a new Stella Ryman book in town: The Labours of Mrs Stella Ryman.

Mel Anastasiou writes The Fairmount Manor Mysteries series, starring Mrs Stella Ryman, The Hertfordshire Pub Mysteries series, starring Spencer Stevens, and the Monument Studios Mysteries starring Frankie Ray as The Extra. Mel is Senior Acquisitions Editor with Pulp Literature Press.

If you enjoy reading Mel Anastasiou’s writing tips, get her pocket-sized writing guide, The Writer’s Boon Companion: Thirty Days Towards an Extraordinary Volume, here

Motivates, organizes, encourages, inspires.

 

2019 Year of Authors: 20th – 24th May

This is week 20, which starts on May 20th, and you all know the drill by know. Every week, we’re featuring five authors, artists, and poets whose work graces the first 20 issues of our magazine. 20 must be our lucky number … wouldn’t you know it, even Issue 20 is on sale this week!

20th – 24th May 2019

Monday: Karlo YeagerIssue 4

Karlo Yeager was born and raised in Puerto Rico and now lives in Baltimore. He strives to explore themes such as being part of several cultures, but not belonging to any. When not answering questions like, “Why Baltimore?” he volunteers with the Baltimore Science Fiction Society.

Tuesday: Kate Austin, Issue 6

Kate Austin is a poet, a novelist, a short story writer, an editor, an acquisitions editor, a paralegal, an occasional teacher (both of paralegals and of writers), an avid movie goer, a reader of a book a day, a good friend, and busy!

Wednesday: Katie Vautour, Issue 12

Katie Vautour is a visual artist and writer published in a variety of literary journals, and though she dabbles in all genres (including fiction, non-fiction, and playwriting), her main focus is poetry. She is also the director of the Piper’s Frith Writing Retreat. Katie graduated from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design University with majors in Filmmaking, Painting, Drawing and Art History. She has participated in residencies in Oaxaca, Mexico, New Brunswick, and the Banff Centre. She exhibits her mixed-media work, paintings, and drawings throughout Atlantic Canada, and gladly repurposes offered used materials into art. She lives in St. John’s.

Issue 12 cover by Melissa Mary Duncan

Thursday: kc dyer, Issue 16

kc dyer is the author of seven books for teens and adults. Her most recent title, a romantic comedy from Berkley Books, is the internationally best-selling Finding Fraser. kc resides in the wilds of British Columbia in the company of an assortment of mammals, some of them human. She likes to walk in the woods and write books.

Issue 16 cover art by Akem

Friday: Kelli Allen, Issue 17 & 20

Kelli Allen’s work has appeared in numerous journals in the US and internationally. She is Poetry Editor for The Lindenwood Review and directs River Styx’s Hungry Young Poets series. Her chapbook, Some Animals, won the 2016 Etchings Press Prize. Her chapbook, How We Disappear, won the 2016 Damfino Press chapbook award. Her full-length poetry collection, Otherwise, Soft White Ash, arrived from John Gosslee Books in 2012 and was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. Her third full length poetry collection, Banjo’s Inside Coyote  is now available through C&R Press.

Issue 17 cover featuring stellar artwork by Britt-Lise NewsteadIssue 20 cover with tech-slum cover by Ben Baldwin

2019 Year of Authors: 13th – 17th May

What are you doing this morning? Enjoying a coffee, listening to the birds sing, scrolling through your Facebook feed … and oh what’s this? A post from your mother. Hmm… wasn’t there something you were supposed to do this weekend? Oh yeah… Mother’s Day. Whoops. Well, let’s get her some reading material in the better-late-than-never category, shall we? This is week 19 of Pulp Literature’s Year of Authors, and we’ve got the prices to perk up your mother’s day.

13th – 17th May 2019

Monday: Jonathon DaltonIssue 11

Jonathon Dalton draws comics about strange, alien worlds and the ordinary people who live in them. He lives on the outskirts of Vancouver and teaches elementary school in his spare time. His past work includes the self-published graphic novels A Mad Tea-Party and the Xeric-winning Lords of Death and Life, as well as short comics in several anthologies. He also drew The Legend of Bold Riley: The Talking Bone, written by Leia Weathington.

Tuesday: Jono Naito, Issue 11

Jono Naito, a writer and game designer, hold a MFA from Syracuse University, where they are also an Assistant Editor at Salt Hill. Their work has appeared here and there (and everywhere).

Wednesday: Joseph Stilwell, Issue 14 & 19

Joseph Stilwell has slain gods, devoured galaxies, and sired several ruling dynasties. He is either the most powerful man in the multiverse, or a very accomplished liar. Either way, he’s a hell of a storyteller.  Along with his partner in crime, artist Hugh Henderson, he created Blue Skies Over Nine Isles, a post-post-apocalyptic comic book, the first two issues of which appeared in PL Issues 14 and 19.

Thursday: Jude Neale, Issue 8 & 13

Jude Neale is a Canadian poet, vocalist, spoken word performer and mentor. Jude has written and co-written six books. Her most recent book is a collaboration with acclaimed writer and poet, Bonnie Nish. Cantata in Two Voices was written in turn, line by line in 50 days. This is the fourth book Jude has written on her phone.

Issue 8 cover art by Mel AnastasiouIssue 13 cover by Zoran Pekovic

Friday: Julian Mortimer Smith, Issue 8 

Julian Mortimer Smith is a science fiction and fantasy writer based in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. An active SFWA member with multiple publication credits, he’s also a writer and editor for numerous boardgames.

Issue 8 cover art by Mel Anastasiou